Clam vs Scallop what difference

what is difference between Clam and Scallop

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klæm/
  • (æ-tensing) IPA(key): [kleəm]
  • Rhymes: -æm

Etymology 1

From Middle English clam (pincers, vice, clamp), from Old English clamm (bond, fetter, grip, grasp), from Proto-Germanic *klamjaną (press, squeeze together). The sense “dollar” may allude to wampum.

Noun

clam (plural clams)

  1. A bivalve mollusk of many kinds, especially those that are edible; for example the soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria), the hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria), the sea clam or hen clam (Spisula solidissima), and other species. The name is said to have been given originally to the Tridacna gigas, a huge East Indian bivalve.
  2. Strong pincers or forceps.
  3. A kind of vise, usually of wood.
  4. (US, slang, chiefly in the plural) A dollar.
  5. (slang, derogatory) A Scientologist.
  6. (slang, vulgar) A vagina.
  7. (informal) One who clams up; a taciturn person, one who refuses to speak.
  8. (dated, US, slang) mouth (Now found mostly in the expression shut one’s clam)
Derived terms
  • bearded clam
  • clambake
  • clamshell
  • clam chowder
  • clam shack
  • clam up
  • happy as a clam
Translations

Verb

clam (third-person singular simple present clams, present participle clamming, simple past and past participle clammed)

  1. To dig for clams.
Translations

See also

  • clammy

Etymology 2

Noun

clam (plural clams)

  1. A crash or clangor made by ringing all the bells of a chime at once.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nares to this entry?)

Verb

clam (third-person singular simple present clams, present participle clamming, simple past and past participle clammed)

  1. To produce, in bellringing, a clam or clangor; to cause to clang.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nares to this entry?)

Etymology 3

From Middle English clammen (to smear, bedaub), from Old English clǣman (to smear, bedaub). Cognate with German klamm (clammy). See also clammy (damp, cold and sticky) and clem (to adhere, stick, plug (a hole)).

Adjective

clam (comparative clammer, superlative clammest)

  1. (obsolete) clammy.
    • 1808, John Jamieson, An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language:
      Ice is said to be clam, when beginning to melt with the sun or otherwise, and not easy to be slid upon.

Noun

clam

  1. clamminess; moisture
    • 1837, Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
      The clam of death.

Verb

clam (third-person singular simple present clams, present participle clamming, simple past and past participle clammed)

  1. To be moist or glutinous; to stick; to adhere.
    • A chilling sweat , a damp of jealousy,
      Hangs on my brows, and clams upon my limbs
  2. To clog, as with glutinous or viscous matter.

Etymology 4

Noun

clam (plural clams)

  1. (rowing) Alternative form of CLAM

Anagrams

  • ALCM, CAML, Caml, Malc, calm

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈklam/
  • Rhymes: -am

Noun

clam m (plural clams)

  1. clamor

Synonyms

  • clamor

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *ḱl-, zero-grade form of *ḱel- (to hide, conceal). Cognate to Latin cēlō.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /klam/, [kɫ̪ä̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /klam/, [klɑm]

Adverb

clam (not comparable)

  1. clandestinely, secretly, privately
  2. stealthily

Derived terms

  • clanculō
  • clanculum

Related terms

  • clanculārius
  • clandestīnō
  • clandestīnus

Preposition

clam (+ accusative, ablative)

  1. (with accusative or, rarely, ablative) without the knowledge of, unknown to
    • 163 B.C.E. Terence, Heauton Timorumenos, Act II, Scene II:
      Neque adeō clam mē est.

      Nor indeed is it unknown to me.

References

  • clam in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • clam in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • clam in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • clam in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Old English

Alternative forms

  • (NE dialects) cloam

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /klɑːm/

Noun

clām m

  1. mud

Declension


Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *klamos (sick, leprous). Cognate with Welsh claf (sick, ill).

Noun

clam m or f

  1. leper

Usage notes

The noun’s gender depends on the leper’s gender. If the leper is male, it is masculine. If the leper is female, it is feminine.

Inflection

Descendants

  • Middle Irish: clam

Mutation

References

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “clam”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language


English

Alternative forms

  • scollop (rare, chiefly British)

Etymology

From Old French escalope (shell).

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): (rhymes with trollop) /ˈskɒləp/, (rhymes with gallop) /ˈskæləp/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): (rhymes with trollop) /ˈskɒləp/, (rhymes with gallop) /ˈskæləp/
  • (traditional New England) IPA(key): (rhymes with trollop) /ˈskɑləp/
  • (UK) IPA(key): (rhymes with gallop) /ˈskaləp/, (rhymes with trollop) /ˈskɒləp/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): (rhymes with gallop) /ˈskɛlɘp/, (rhymes with trollop) /ˈskɔlɘp/
  • (Ireland) IPA(key): (rhymes with gallop) /ˈskaləp/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): (rhymes with gallop) /ˈskaləp/
  • Rhymes: -æləp, -ɒləp

Noun

scallop (plural scallops)

  1. Any of various marine bivalve molluscs of the family Pectinidae which are free-swimming.
    Synonyms: (UK) scollop, (parts of Australia) sea scallop
  2. One of a series of curves, forming an edge similar to a scallop shell.
  3. (cooking) A fillet of meat, escalope.
  4. (cooking) A form of fried potato.
    Synonyms: (parts of Australia) potato cake, (parts of Australia) potato scallop
  5. A dish shaped like a scallop shell.

Usage notes

To specify bivalves, rather than fillets of meat or potatoes, sea scallop and similar terms may be used instead. This is particularly done when several of these are used, such as in cookbooks and in parts of Australia.

Derived terms

  • Yesso scallop (Mizuhopecten yessoensis)

Translations

Verb

scallop (third-person singular simple present scallops, present participle scalloping, simple past and past participle scalloped)

  1. To create or form an edge in the shape of a crescent or multiple crescents.
  2. (transitive) To bake in a casserole (gratin), originally in a scallop shell; especially used in form scalloped
  3. (intransitive) To harvest scallops

Translations

Further reading

  • scallop on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • callops

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