clarify vs elucidate what difference

what is difference between clarify and elucidate

English

Etymology

From Middle English clarifien, from Old French clarifiier, from Latin clārificō, clārificāre; clārus (clear) + faciō, facere (make).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈklæɹɪfaɪ/

Verb

clarify (third-person singular simple present clarifies, present participle clarifying, simple past and past participle clarified)

  1. (of liquids, such as wine or syrup) To make clear or bright by freeing from feculent matter
  2. To make clear or easily understood; to explain in order to remove doubt or obscurity
    Synonyms: explicitize, get something straight
    • To clarify his reason, to rectify his will.
    • 2014, Mario Martinez, The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs that Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success
      We assimilate cultural interpretations based on the value our cultural editors determine and the level of abundance we are allowed to have without violating tribal horizons. I should clarify that I am not suggesting that we are passive recipients of everything the cultural editors tell us about ourselves.
    • 2015, United States Department of Justice, Investigation of the Ferguson Police Department
      The report does not clarify what investigation the supervisor did, if any, to assess the suspect’s allegations, or how he determined that the allegations were false. Supervisors also fail to provide recommendations for how to ensure officer safety and minimize the need for force going forward.
  3. (ergative) To grow or become clear or transparent; to become free from feculent impurities, as wine or other liquid under clarification.
  4. (ergative) To grow clear or bright; to clear up.
  5. (obsolete) To glorify.

Related terms

  • clarification

Translations



English

Etymology

From Late Latin ēlūcidātus, perfect passive participle of ēlūcidō (clarify), from Latin ex- and lūcidus (clear).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈluː.sɪ.de͡ɪt/
  • (US) enPR: ĭ-lo͞o’-sĭ-dāt

Verb

elucidate (third-person singular simple present elucidates, present participle elucidating, simple past and past participle elucidated)

  1. (transitive) To make clear; to clarify; to shed light upon.
    • 1817, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, ch. 13:
      The business, however, though not perfectly elucidated by this speech, soon ceased to be a puzzle.
    • 1960, “Medicine: Unmasking the Brain,” Time, 4 April:
      [P]hysicians at the annual meeting of the American Academy of General Practice were fascinated by a 3-ft. model showing the brain’s components in 20 layers of translucent plastic, and wired for colored lights to elucidate some of its workings.
    • 2004, David Bernstein, “Philosophy Hitches a Ride With ‘The Sopranos’,” New York Times, 13 April (retrieved 19 Aug. 2009):
      The new Sopranos volume has 17 essays that examine the television show and elucidate concepts from classical philosophers, including Aristotle, Machiavelli, Nietzsche, Sun Tzu and Plato.
    Synonyms: explicate, illuminate

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


Italian

Verb

elucidate

  1. inflection of elucidare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Participle

elucidate

  1. feminine plural of the past participle of elucidare

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eː.luː.kiˈdaː.te/, [eːɫ̪uːkɪˈd̪äːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /e.lu.t͡ʃiˈda.te/, [ɛlut͡ʃiˈd̪ɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

ēlūcidāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of ēlūcidō

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