claudication vs lameness what difference

what is difference between claudication and lameness

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin claudicātiō (limping, noun), from claudicō (to limp, halt, be lame) +‎ -ātiō (-ation, nominal suffix).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌklɔː.dɪˈkeɪ.ʃən/, /ˌklɔː.dɪˈkeɪ.ʃn̩/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

claudication (countable and uncountable, plural claudications)

  1. (medicine, uncountable) Limping.
  2. (medicine, countable) A condition in which temporary cramp-like pain in the calf muscles is induced by exercise, typically caused by obstruction of the arteries.

Derived terms

  • claudicate

References

  • “claudication”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “claudication”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

French

Etymology

From Latin claudicātiō.

Pronunciation

Noun

claudication f (plural claudications)

  1. limp, lameness

Further reading

  • “claudication” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

lame +‎ -ness

Noun

lameness (countable and uncountable, plural lamenesses)

  1. An impediment to walking due to the feet or legs.
    His lameness may have prevented him from walking but it didn’t stop him from running for public office.
  2. (informal) The quality of being lame, pathetic or uncool.
    I can’t believe the lameness of the special effects in that movie.

Anagrams

  • Sleemans, maleness, maneless, meanless, nameless, salesmen

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