clean vs pick what difference

what is difference between clean and pick

English

Etymology

From Middle English clene, clane, from Old English clǣne (clean, pure), from Proto-Germanic *klainiz (shining, fine, splendid, tender), from Proto-Indo-European *glēy- (gleaming), from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (to gleam). Cognate with Scots clean (absolute, pure, clear, empty) and clene, clane (clean), North Frisian klien (small), Dutch klein (small), Low German kleen (small), German klein (small), Swedish klen (weak, feeble, delicate), Icelandic klénn (poor, feeble, petty, snug, puny, cheesy, lame).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kliːn/, [kʰl̥iːn]
  • (General American) enPR: klēn, IPA(key): /klin/, [kʰl̥ĩn]
  • ((Ireland), dated), enPR: klān, IPA(key): /kleːn/, [kʰl̥eːn]
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Adjective

clean (comparative cleaner, superlative cleanest)

  1. (heading, physical) Free of dirt or impurities or protruberances.
    1. Not dirty.
      • Then his sallow face brightened, for the hall had been carefully furnished, and was very clean. ¶ There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    2. In an unmarked condition.
    3. (aerodynamics) Allowing an uninterrupted flow over surfaces, without protrusions such as racks or landing gear.
    4. Empty.
    5. (of metal) Having relatively few impurities.
  2. (heading, behavioural) Free of immorality or criminality.
    1. Pure, especially morally or religiously.
      • ?, Alfred Tennyson, St. Simeon Stylites
        That I am whole, and clean, and meet for Heaven.
      • 1914, New Zealand Parliamentary Debates (volume 168, page 195)
        I do not think there is any member in this House who will not agree that that is the clean thing to do. Any member sitting on the Government benches will admit in private that that is the proper course for members who break faith.
    2. Not having used drugs or alcohol.
    3. (of criminal, driving, etc. records) Without restrictions or penalties, or someone having such a record.
    4. (informal) Not in possession of weapons or contraband such as drugs.
    5. (informal) Devoid of profanity.
  3. smooth, exact, and performed well
  4. (obsolete) Total; utter. (still in “clean sweep”)
    • Moreover, I find there are some Words now in French which are turned to a Countersense [] Cocu is taken for one whose Wife is light, and hath made him a passive Cuckold; whereas clean contrary, Cocu, which is the Cuckow, doth use to lay her Eggs in another Bird’s Nest.
  5. (informal) Cool or neat.
  6. (health) Being free of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).
  7. That does not damage the environment.
  8. Free from that which is useless or injurious; without defects.
  9. Free from restraint or neglect; complete; entire.
    • When ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not make clean riddance of corners of thy field.
  10. Well-proportioned; shapely.
  11. (climbing, of a route) Ascended without falling.

Synonyms

  • (not dirty): Thesaurus:clean

Antonyms

  • dirty
  • unclean

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

clean (plural cleans)

  1. Removal of dirt.
  2. (weightlifting) The first part of the event clean and jerk in which the weight is brought from the ground to the shoulders.

Derived terms

  • power clean

Translations

Verb

clean (third-person singular simple present cleans, present participle cleaning, simple past and past participle cleaned)

  1. (transitive) To remove dirt from a place or object.
  2. (transitive) To tidy up, make a place neat.
  3. (transitive, climbing) To remove equipment from a climbing route after it was previously lead climbed.
  4. (intransitive) To make things clean in general.
  5. (transitive, computing) To remove unnecessary files, etc. from (a directory, etc.).
  6. (intransitive, curling) To brush the ice lightly in front of a moving rock to remove any debris and ensure a correct line; less vigorous than a sweep.
  7. (manga fandom slang) To purge a raw of any blemishes caused by the scanning process such as brown tinting and poor color contrast.
  8. To remove guts and/or scales of a butchered animal.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:make clean

Derived terms

Translations

Adverb

clean (comparative cleaner, superlative cleanest)

  1. Fully and completely.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Calne, Lance, Lenca, ancle, clane, lance

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English clean.

Adjective

clean (neuter clean, plural and definite singular attributive clean)

  1. drugfree, not having used recreational drugs

German

Etymology

From English clean. Doublet of klein.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kliːn]

Adjective

clean (comparative cleaner, superlative am cleansten)

  1. (colloquial) clean, drugfree

Declension

Further reading

  • “clean” in Duden online

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish clíabán.

Noun

clean m (genitive singular clean, plural cleanyn)

  1. cradle (oscillating bed for a baby)
  2. cot
  3. cage (of birds)
  4. pannier

Mutation


Romanian

Etymology

From Bulgarian клйан (kljan), from Proto-Slavic *klenь.

Noun

clean m (plural cleni)

  1. chub (Squalius cephalus)

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English piken, picken, pikken, from Old English *piccian, *pīcian (attested in pīcung (a pricking)), and pȳcan (to pick, prick, pluck), both from Proto-Germanic *pikkōną, *pūkijaną (to pick, peck, prick, knock), from Proto-Indo-European *bew-, *bu- (to make a dull, hollow sound). Cognate with Dutch pikken (to pick), German picken (to pick, peck), Old Norse pikka, pjakka (whence Icelandic pikka (to pick, prick), Swedish picka (to pick, peck)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪk/, [pʰɪk]
  • Homophone: pic
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Noun

pick (plural picks)

  1. A tool used for digging; a pickaxe.
  2. A tool for unlocking a lock without the original key; a lock pick, picklock.
  3. A comb with long widely spaced teeth, for use with tightly curled hair.
  4. A choice; ability to choose.
    • 1858, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, What Will He Do With It?
      France and Russia have the pick of our stables.
  5. That which would be picked or chosen first; the best.
  6. (basketball) A screen.
  7. (lacrosse) An offensive tactic in which a player stands so as to block a defender from reaching a teammate.
  8. (American football) An interception.
  9. (baseball) A good defensive play by an infielder.
  10. (baseball) A pickoff.
  11. (music) A tool used for strumming the strings of a guitar; a plectrum.
  12. A pointed hammer used for dressing millstones.
  13. (obsolete) A pike or spike; the sharp point fixed in the center of a buckler.
    • Take down my buckler [] and grind the pick on ‘t.
  14. (printing, dated) A particle of ink or paper embedded in the hollow of a letter, filling up its face, and causing a spot on a printed sheet.
    • c. 1866, Thomas MacKellar, The American Printer
      If it be in the smallest degree gritty, it clogs the form, and consequently produces a thick and imperfect impression; no pains should, therefore, be spared to render it perfectly smooth; it may then be made to work as clear and free from picks
  15. (art, painting) That which is picked in, as with a pointed pencil, to correct an unevenness in a picture.
  16. (weaving) The blow that drives the shuttle, used in calculating the speed of a loom (in picks per minute); hence, in describing the fineness of a fabric, a weft thread.

Derived terms

  • pickaxe
  • take one’s pick
  • toothpick

Translations

Verb

pick (third-person singular simple present picks, present participle picking, simple past and past participle picked)

  1. To grasp and pull with the fingers or fingernails.
    Don’t pick at that scab.
    He picked his nose.
  2. To harvest a fruit or vegetable for consumption by removing it from the plant to which it is attached; to harvest an entire plant by removing it from the ground.
    It’s time to pick the tomatoes.
  3. To pull apart or away, especially with the fingers; to pluck.
    She picked flowers in the meadow.
    to pick feathers from a fowl
  4. To take up; especially, to gather from here and there; to collect; to bring together.
    to pick rags
  5. To remove something from somewhere with a pointed instrument, with the fingers, or with the teeth.
    to pick the teeth; to pick a bone; to pick a goose; to pick a pocket
    • 1785, William Cowper, The Task
      He picks clean teeth, and, busy as he seems / With an old tavern quill, is hungry yet.
    • 1867, Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist Chapter 43
      He was charged with attempting to pick a pocket, and they found a silver snuff-box on him,–his own, my dear, his own, for he took snuff himself, and was very fond of it.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      For the pocket in which Erskine kept this key was not the kind of pocket that Watt could pick. For it was no ordinary pocket, no, but a secret one, sewn on to the front of Erskine’s underhose.
  6. To decide upon, from a set of options; to select.
    I’ll pick the one with the nicest name.
  7. (transitive) To seek (a fight or quarrel) where the opportunity arises.
  8. (cricket) To recognise the type of ball being bowled by a bowler by studying the position of the hand and arm as the ball is released.
    He didn’t pick the googly, and was bowled.
  9. (music) To pluck the individual strings of a musical instrument or to play such an instrument.
    He picked a tune on his banjo.
  10. To open (a lock) with a wire, lock pick, etc.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The lock was of a kind that Watt could not pick. Watt could pick simple locks, but he could not pick obscure locks.
  11. To eat slowly, sparingly, or by morsels; to nibble.
    • 1693, John Dryden, Third Satire of Persius
      Why stand’st thou picking? Is thy palate sore?
  12. To do anything fastidiously or carefully, or by attending to small things; to select something with care.
    I gingerly picked my way between the thorny shrubs.
  13. To steal; to pilfer.
    • Book of Common Prayer
      to keep my hands from picking and stealing
  14. (obsolete) To throw; to pitch.
  15. (dated) To peck at, as a bird with its beak; to strike at with anything pointed; to act upon with a pointed instrument; to pierce; to prick, as with a pin.
  16. (transitive, intransitive) To separate or open by means of a sharp point or points.
    to pick matted wool, cotton, oakum, etc.
    • 1912, Victor Whitechurch, Thrilling Stories of the Railway
      Naphtha lamps shed a weird light over a busy scene, for the work was being continued night and day. A score or so of sturdy navvies were shovelling and picking along the track.
  17. (basketball) To screen.
Conjugation

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • mattock

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Verb

pick

  1. singular imperative of picken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of picken

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English pyke, from Old English pīc.

Noun

pick (plural pickkès)

  1. a pike

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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