clean vs white what difference

what is difference between clean and white

English

Etymology

From Middle English clene, clane, from Old English clǣne (clean, pure), from Proto-Germanic *klainiz (shining, fine, splendid, tender), from Proto-Indo-European *glēy- (gleaming), from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (to gleam). Cognate with Scots clean (absolute, pure, clear, empty) and clene, clane (clean), North Frisian klien (small), Dutch klein (small), Low German kleen (small), German klein (small), Swedish klen (weak, feeble, delicate), Icelandic klénn (poor, feeble, petty, snug, puny, cheesy, lame).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kliːn/, [kʰl̥iːn]
  • (General American) enPR: klēn, IPA(key): /klin/, [kʰl̥ĩn]
  • ((Ireland), dated), enPR: klān, IPA(key): /kleːn/, [kʰl̥eːn]
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Adjective

clean (comparative cleaner, superlative cleanest)

  1. (heading, physical) Free of dirt or impurities or protruberances.
    1. Not dirty.
      • Then his sallow face brightened, for the hall had been carefully furnished, and was very clean. ¶ There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
    2. In an unmarked condition.
    3. (aerodynamics) Allowing an uninterrupted flow over surfaces, without protrusions such as racks or landing gear.
    4. Empty.
    5. (of metal) Having relatively few impurities.
  2. (heading, behavioural) Free of immorality or criminality.
    1. Pure, especially morally or religiously.
      • ?, Alfred Tennyson, St. Simeon Stylites
        That I am whole, and clean, and meet for Heaven.
      • 1914, New Zealand Parliamentary Debates (volume 168, page 195)
        I do not think there is any member in this House who will not agree that that is the clean thing to do. Any member sitting on the Government benches will admit in private that that is the proper course for members who break faith.
    2. Not having used drugs or alcohol.
    3. (of criminal, driving, etc. records) Without restrictions or penalties, or someone having such a record.
    4. (informal) Not in possession of weapons or contraband such as drugs.
    5. (informal) Devoid of profanity.
  3. smooth, exact, and performed well
  4. (obsolete) Total; utter. (still in “clean sweep”)
    • Moreover, I find there are some Words now in French which are turned to a Countersense [] Cocu is taken for one whose Wife is light, and hath made him a passive Cuckold; whereas clean contrary, Cocu, which is the Cuckow, doth use to lay her Eggs in another Bird’s Nest.
  5. (informal) Cool or neat.
  6. (health) Being free of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).
  7. That does not damage the environment.
  8. Free from that which is useless or injurious; without defects.
  9. Free from restraint or neglect; complete; entire.
    • When ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not make clean riddance of corners of thy field.
  10. Well-proportioned; shapely.
  11. (climbing, of a route) Ascended without falling.

Synonyms

  • (not dirty): Thesaurus:clean

Antonyms

  • dirty
  • unclean

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

clean (plural cleans)

  1. Removal of dirt.
  2. (weightlifting) The first part of the event clean and jerk in which the weight is brought from the ground to the shoulders.

Derived terms

  • power clean

Translations

Verb

clean (third-person singular simple present cleans, present participle cleaning, simple past and past participle cleaned)

  1. (transitive) To remove dirt from a place or object.
  2. (transitive) To tidy up, make a place neat.
  3. (transitive, climbing) To remove equipment from a climbing route after it was previously lead climbed.
  4. (intransitive) To make things clean in general.
  5. (transitive, computing) To remove unnecessary files, etc. from (a directory, etc.).
  6. (intransitive, curling) To brush the ice lightly in front of a moving rock to remove any debris and ensure a correct line; less vigorous than a sweep.
  7. (manga fandom slang) To purge a raw of any blemishes caused by the scanning process such as brown tinting and poor color contrast.
  8. To remove guts and/or scales of a butchered animal.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:make clean

Derived terms

Translations

Adverb

clean (comparative cleaner, superlative cleanest)

  1. Fully and completely.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Calne, Lance, Lenca, ancle, clane, lance

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English clean.

Adjective

clean (neuter clean, plural and definite singular attributive clean)

  1. drugfree, not having used recreational drugs

German

Etymology

From English clean. Doublet of klein.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kliːn]

Adjective

clean (comparative cleaner, superlative am cleansten)

  1. (colloquial) clean, drugfree

Declension

Further reading

  • “clean” in Duden online

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish clíabán.

Noun

clean m (genitive singular clean, plural cleanyn)

  1. cradle (oscillating bed for a baby)
  2. cot
  3. cage (of birds)
  4. pannier

Mutation


Romanian

Etymology

From Bulgarian клйан (kljan), from Proto-Slavic *klenь.

Noun

clean m (plural cleni)

  1. chub (Squalius cephalus)

Declension



English

Alternative forms

  • whight, whyte, whyght (obsolete)
  • White (race-related)

Etymology

From Middle English whit, hwit, from Old English hwīt, from Proto-West Germanic *hwīt, from Proto-Germanic *hwītaz (whence also West Frisian wyt, Dutch wit, German weiß, Norwegian Bokmål hvit, Norwegian Nynorsk kvit), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱweydós, a byform of *ḱweytós (bright; shine). Compare Lithuanian šviẽsti (to gleam), šviesa (light), Old Church Slavonic свѣтъ (světŭ, light), свѣтьлъ (světĭlŭ, clear, bright), Persian سفید(sefid), Avestan ????????????????????????(spaēta, white), Sanskrit श्वेत (śvetá, white, bright).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wīt, IPA(key): /waɪt/
  • (without the winewhine merger) enPR: hwīt, IPA(key): /ʍaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Homophones: wight, Wight, wite (accents with the wine-whine merger)

Adjective

white (comparative whiter or more white, superlative whitest or most white)

  1. Bright and colourless; reflecting equal quantities of all frequencies of visible light.
    • c. 1878, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “Holidays”
      white as the whitest lily on a stream.
    • 1381, quoted in Hans Kurath & Sherman M. Kuhn, eds., Middle English Dictionary, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, ISBN 978-0-472-01044-8, page 1242 (1961):
      dorrẹ̅, dōrī adj. & n. [] cook. glazed with a yellow substance; pome(s ~, sopes ~. [] 1381 Pegge Cook. Recipes page 114: For to make Soupys dorry. Nym onyons [] Nym wyn [] toste wyte bred and do yt in dischis, and god Almande mylk.
    Antonyms: black, nonwhite, unwhite
  2. (sometimes capitalized) Of or relating to Caucasians, people of European descent with light-coloured skin.
  3. (chiefly historical) Designated for use by Caucasians.
  4. Relatively light or pale in colour.
  5. Pale or pallid, as from fear, illness, etc.
  6. (of a person or skin) Lacking coloration (tan) from ultraviolet light; not tanned.
    Synonyms: fair, pale
    Antonym: tanned
  7. (of coffee or tea) Containing cream, milk, or creamer.
    Antonym: black
  8. (board games, chess) The standard denomination of the playing pieces of a board game deemed to belong to the white set, no matter what the actual colour.
  9. Pertaining to an ecclesiastical order whose adherents dress in white habits; Cistercian.
  10. Honourable, fair; decent.
    • White as thy fame, and as thy honour clear.
    • 1916, Julia Frankau, Twilight
      He’s a fine fellow, this Gabriel Stanton, a white man all through
    • 1953, Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye, Penguin, 2010, p.12:
      ‘We’ve only met twice and you’ve been more than white to me both times.’
  11. Grey, as from old age; having silvery hair; hoary.
  12. (archaic) Characterized by freedom from that which disturbs, and the like; fortunate; happy; favourable.
  13. (obsolete) Regarded with especial favour; favourite; darling.
    • Come forth, my white spouse.
    • c. 1626, John Ford, Tis Pity She’s a Whore
      I am his white boy, and will not be gulled.
  14. (politics) Pertaining to constitutional or anti-revolutionary political parties or movements.
    • 1932, Duff Cooper, Talleyrand, Folio Society, 2010, p.163:
      Aimée de Coigny had always adopted with enthusiasm the political views of her ruling lover and she had thus already held nearly every shade of opinion from red republicanism to white reaction.
  15. (of tea) Made from immature leaves and shoots.
  16. (typography) Not containing characters; see white space.
  17. (typography) Said of a symbol or character outline, not solid, not filled with color. Compare black (said of a character or symbol filled with color).
    Compare two Unicode symbols: = “WHITE RIGHT POINTING INDEX”; = “BLACK RIGHT POINTING INDEX”
  18. Characterised by the presence of snow.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Bislama: waet
  • Tok Pisin: wait
  • Japanese: ホワイト (howaito)
  • white fella
    • Nyunga: wadjela
  • white gin
    • Gamilaraay: waatyin
    • Ngiyambaa: wadjiin
    • Wiradhuri: waajin

Translations

See white/translations § Adjective.

Noun

white (countable and uncountable, plural whites)

  1. The color/colour of snow or milk; the colour of light containing equal amounts of all visible wavelengths.
  2. A person of European descent with light-coloured skin.
  3. Any butterfly of the family Pieridae.
  4. (countable and uncountable) White wine.
  5. (countable) Any object or substance that is of the color white.
    1. The albumen of bird eggs (egg white).
    2. (anatomy) The sclera, white of the eye.
    3. (sports, billiards, snooker, pool) The cue ball in cue games.
    4. (slang, US, MLE) Cocaine
    5. The snow- or ice-covered “green” in snow golf.
    6. A white pigment.
      Venice white
  6. (archery) The central part of the butt, which was formerly painted white; the centre of a mark at which a missile is shot.
  7. The enclosed part of a letter of the alphabet, especially when handwritten.
    • 1594, Hugh Plat, The Jewell House of Art and Nature, London, Chapter 38, p. 42,[3]
      Also it giueth a great grace to your writing, if the whites of certeine letters bee made of one equall bignesse with the o. supposing the same were all round, as the white of the b. of the a. p. y. v. w. x. q. d. g. and s.
    • 1677, Hannah Woolley, The Compleat Servant-Maid, London: T. Passinger, p. 18,[4]
      [] the a. b. d. g. o. p. q. &c. [] must be made with equal whites.
    • 1931, Margery Allingham, Police at the Funeral, Penguin, 1939, Chapter 14, p. 157,[5]
      She copied the whole alphabet like that, as though only the inside whites of the letters registered on her mind.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

white (third-person singular simple present whites, present participle whiting, simple past and past participle whited)

  1. (transitive) To make white; to whiten; to bleach.
    • whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of [] uncleanness
    • so as no fuller on earth can white them

Derived terms

  • white out

See also

  • leucite
  • leukoma
  • leukosis
  • Sauvignon blanc
  • Svetambara
  • terra alba

Further reading

  • white on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Race on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • white on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Anagrams

  • withe

Middle English

Adjective

white

  1. inflection of whit:
    1. weak singular
    2. strong/weak plural
  2. Alternative form of whit

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