Cliff vs Bluff what difference

what is difference between Cliff and Bluff

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: klĭf, IPA(key): /klɪf/, [kl̥ʰɪf]
  • Rhymes: -ɪf

Etymology 1

From Middle English clyf, from Old English clif, from Proto-Germanic *klibą.

Noun

cliff (plural cliffs)

  1. A vertical (or nearly vertical) rock face.
    Synonym: precipice
    Hyponym: escarpment
    Coordinate term: bluff
  2. (figuratively) A point where something abruptly fails or decreases in value etc.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

cliff (plural cliffs)

  1. (music) Obsolete form of clef.

Further reading

  • cliff on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /blʌf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf

Etymology 1

Probably from Dutch bluffen (to brag), from Middle Dutch bluffen (to make something swell; to bluff); or from the Dutch noun bluf (bragging). Related to German verblüffen (to stump, perplex).

Noun

bluff (countable and uncountable, plural bluffs)

  1. An act of bluffing; a false expression of the strength of one’s position in order to intimidate; braggadocio.
  2. (poker) An attempt to represent oneself as holding a stronger hand than one actually does.
  3. (US, dated) The card game poker.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)
  4. One who bluffs; a bluffer.
  5. (slang, dated) An excuse.
Derived terms
  • call someone’s bluff
Translations

Verb

bluff (third-person singular simple present bluffs, present participle bluffing, simple past and past participle bluffed)

  1. (poker) To make a bluff; to give the impression that one’s hand is stronger than it is.
  2. (by analogy) To frighten or deter with a false show of strength or confidence; to give a false impression of strength or temerity in order to intimidate and gain some advantage.
  3. To take advantage by bluffing.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Related to Middle Low German blaff (smooth).

Noun

bluff (plural bluffs)

  1. A high, steep bank, for example by a river or the sea, or beside a ravine or plain; a cliff with a broad face.
  2. (Canadian Prairies) A small wood or stand of trees, typically poplar or willow.
Derived terms
  • Council Bluffs
  • DeValls Bluff
  • Red Bluff
  • Scotts Bluff County
Translations

Adjective

bluff (comparative bluffer, superlative bluffest)

  1. Having a broad, flattened front.
  2. Rising steeply with a flat or rounded front.
    • 1769, William Falconer, “Côte en écore” (entry in An Universal Dictionary of the Marine)
      a bluff or bold shore
    • 1845, Sylvester Judd, Margaret: A Tale of the Real and the Ideal, Blight and Bloom; Including Sketches of a Place Not Before Described, Called Mons Christi
      Its banks, if not really steep, had a bluff and precipitous aspect.
  3. Surly; churlish; gruff; rough.
    • 1883: Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      [] he had a bluff, rough-and-ready face, all roughened and reddened and lined in his long travels.
  4. Roughly frank and hearty in one’s manners.
    Synonyms: abrupt, unceremonious, blunt, brusque
    • 1832, Isaac Taylor, Saturday Evening
      There is indeed a bluff pertinacity which is a proper defence in a moment of surprise.
Translations

Etymology 3

Possibly onomatopoeic, perhaps related to blow and puff.

Verb

bluff (third-person singular simple present bluffs, present participle bluffing, simple past and past participle bluffed)

  1. To fluff, puff or swell up.

Translations

References

  • “bluff” in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 2004.

Further reading

  • bluff on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Bluff in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Danish

Alternative forms

  • bluf

Etymology

Borrowed from English bluff.

Noun

bluff n

  1. bluff

Related terms


French

Etymology

Borrowed from English bluff.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blœf/

Noun

bluff m (plural bluffs)

  1. (chiefly card games) bluff

Further reading

  • “bluff” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English bluff.

Noun

bluff c

  1. a bluff

Declension

Related terms

  • bluffa
  • bluffare
  • bluffmakare

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