climax vs culminate what difference

what is difference between climax and culminate

English

Etymology

From Latin clīmax, from Ancient Greek κλῖμαξ (klîmax, ladder, staircase, [rhetorical] climax), from κλίνω (klínō, I lean, slant).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: klīʹ-măks IPA(key): /ˈklaɪmæks/
  • Rhymes: -aɪmæks

Noun

climax (countable and uncountable, plural climaxes or (rare) climaces)

  1. (originally rhetoric) A rhetorical device in which a series is arranged in ascending order.
  2. (obsolete) An instance of such an ascending series.
    • 1781, John Moore, A view of society and manners in Italy, Vol. I, Ch. vi, p. 63:
      …Expressions for the whole Climax of sensibility…
  3. (narratology) The culmination of a narrative’s rising action, the turning point.
  4. (now commonly) A culmination or acme: the last term in an ascending series, particularly:
    • 1789, Trifler, 448, No. XXXV:
      In the accomplishment of this, they frequently reach the climax of absurdity.
    1. (rhetoric, imprecise) The final term of a rhetorical climax.
      • 1856, Ralph Waldo Emerson, English Traits, Ch. ix, p. 147:
        When he adds epithets of praise, his climax is ‘so English’.
    2. (ecology) The culmination of ecological development, whereby species are in equilibrium with their environment.
      • 1915 July 17, Bulletin of the Illinois State Laboratory:
        The succession of associations leading to a climax represents the process of adjustment to the conditions of stress, and the climax represents a condition of relative equilibrium. Climax associations… are the resultants of certain climatic, geological… conditions.
    3. The culmination of sexual pleasure, an orgasm.
      • 1918, Marie Carmichael Stopes, Married love, 50:
        In many cases the man’s climax comes so swiftly that the woman’s reactions are not nearly ready.

Synonyms

  • (rhetorical device): incrementum; (imprecise): auxesis, catacosmesis
  • (culmination): See Thesaurus:apex

Antonyms

  • (rhetorical device): catacosmesis

Derived terms

  • climactic
  • climax community
  • monoclimax
  • polyclimax

Related terms

  • climacteric

Translations

See also

  • anadiplosis

Verb

climax (third-person singular simple present climaxes, present participle climaxing, simple past and past participle climaxed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To reach or bring to a climax.
    • 2018, Craig Snyder, The Boxers of Youngstown Ohio
      Frank had two bouts in October of 1954, losing them both, and then climaxed his career with a 6-round decision victory over Mickey Warner on December 1, 1954.
  2. (intransitive) To orgasm; to reach orgasm.

Further reading

  • climax in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • climax in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kli.maks/

Noun

climax m (uncountable)

  1. climax (all senses)

Derived terms

  • anteclimax
  • climacique
  • conclimax
  • paraclimax
  • peniclimax
  • subclimax

Romanian

Etymology

From French climax.

Noun

climax n (plural climaxuri)

  1. climax

Declension


Spanish

Noun

climax m (plural climax)

  1. climax


English

Etymology

Recorded since 1647, from Medieval Latin culminatus, the past participle of culminare (to crown), from Latin culmen (peak, the highest point), older form columen (top, summit), from a Proto-Indo-European base *kol-, *kelH- (to project, rise; peak, summit, top), whence also English hill and holm.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkʌl.mɪnˌeɪt/
  • IPA(key): /ˈkʌl.məˌneɪt/

Verb

culminate (third-person singular simple present culminates, present participle culminating, simple past and past participle culminated)

  1. (intransitive, astronomy) Of a heavenly body, to be at the highest point, reach its greatest altitude.
  2. (intransitive, also figuratively) To reach the (physical) summit, highest point, peak etc.
    Synonym: peak
    • 1875, James Dwight Dana, Manual of Geology
      The type of Cycads culminated in the Mesozoic
    • The house of Burgundy was rapidly culminating.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To reach a climax; to come to the decisive point (especially as an end or conclusion).
  4. (transitive) To finalize, bring to a conclusion, form the climax of.
    • 2010, “By the skin of her teeth”, The Economist, 7 Sep 2010:
      The announcement by Tony Windsor and Rob Oakeshott in Canberra culminated more than a fortnight of intensive political horse-trading.

Related terms

  • culm
  • culminant
  • culmination
  • culminating
  • culminated

Translations

Adjective

culminate (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) Relating to the culmen

Further reading

  • culminate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • culminate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Italian

Verb

culminate

  1. inflection of culminare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

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