climax vs culmination what difference

what is difference between climax and culmination

English

Etymology

From Latin clīmax, from Ancient Greek κλῖμαξ (klîmax, ladder, staircase, [rhetorical] climax), from κλίνω (klínō, I lean, slant).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: klīʹ-măks IPA(key): /ˈklaɪmæks/
  • Rhymes: -aɪmæks

Noun

climax (countable and uncountable, plural climaxes or (rare) climaces)

  1. (originally rhetoric) A rhetorical device in which a series is arranged in ascending order.
  2. (obsolete) An instance of such an ascending series.
    • 1781, John Moore, A view of society and manners in Italy, Vol. I, Ch. vi, p. 63:
      …Expressions for the whole Climax of sensibility…
  3. (narratology) The culmination of a narrative’s rising action, the turning point.
  4. (now commonly) A culmination or acme: the last term in an ascending series, particularly:
    • 1789, Trifler, 448, No. XXXV:
      In the accomplishment of this, they frequently reach the climax of absurdity.
    1. (rhetoric, imprecise) The final term of a rhetorical climax.
      • 1856, Ralph Waldo Emerson, English Traits, Ch. ix, p. 147:
        When he adds epithets of praise, his climax is ‘so English’.
    2. (ecology) The culmination of ecological development, whereby species are in equilibrium with their environment.
      • 1915 July 17, Bulletin of the Illinois State Laboratory:
        The succession of associations leading to a climax represents the process of adjustment to the conditions of stress, and the climax represents a condition of relative equilibrium. Climax associations… are the resultants of certain climatic, geological… conditions.
    3. The culmination of sexual pleasure, an orgasm.
      • 1918, Marie Carmichael Stopes, Married love, 50:
        In many cases the man’s climax comes so swiftly that the woman’s reactions are not nearly ready.

Synonyms

  • (rhetorical device): incrementum; (imprecise): auxesis, catacosmesis
  • (culmination): See Thesaurus:apex

Antonyms

  • (rhetorical device): catacosmesis

Derived terms

  • climactic
  • climax community
  • monoclimax
  • polyclimax

Related terms

  • climacteric

Translations

See also

  • anadiplosis

Verb

climax (third-person singular simple present climaxes, present participle climaxing, simple past and past participle climaxed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To reach or bring to a climax.
    • 2018, Craig Snyder, The Boxers of Youngstown Ohio
      Frank had two bouts in October of 1954, losing them both, and then climaxed his career with a 6-round decision victory over Mickey Warner on December 1, 1954.
  2. (intransitive) To orgasm; to reach orgasm.

Further reading

  • climax in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • climax in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kli.maks/

Noun

climax m (uncountable)

  1. climax (all senses)

Derived terms

  • anteclimax
  • climacique
  • conclimax
  • paraclimax
  • peniclimax
  • subclimax

Romanian

Etymology

From French climax.

Noun

climax n (plural climaxuri)

  1. climax

Declension


Spanish

Noun

climax m (plural climax)

  1. climax


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French culmination, from culminer, or from Medieval Latin culminatus + -tion.
Morphologically culminate +‎ -ion

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˌkʌl.məˈneɪ.ʃən/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌkʌl.mɪnˈeɪ.ʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

culmination (countable and uncountable, plural culminations)

  1. (astronomy) The attainment of the highest point of altitude reached by a heavenly body; passage across the meridian; transit.
  2. Attainment or arrival at the highest pitch of glory, power, etc.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:apex

Related terms

  • culminate

Translations


French

Noun

culmination f (plural culminations)

  1. culmination

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