clitter vs stridulate what difference

what is difference between clitter and stridulate

English

Etymology

Related to clatter.

Verb

clitter (third-person singular simple present clitters, present participle clittering, simple past and past participle clittered)

  1. To clatter lightly; to make a soft rattling noise.
    • 1990, Stephen King, The Moving Finger
      Howard [] was even more aware of something else. A clittering sound. It was coming from behind him, and it was getting closer.

Noun

clitter (countable and uncountable, plural clitters)

  1. Loose stones on hillsides deposited by weathering.

Synonyms

  • scree


English

Etymology

Back-formation from stridulation. (From earlier term stridulous; from Latin strīdulus (giving a shrill sound, creaking), from strīdō (utter a shrill or harsh sound; creak, shriek, grate, hiss))

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /stɹɪdjʊˈleɪʃ(ə)n/

Verb

stridulate (third-person singular simple present stridulates, present participle stridulating, simple past and past participle stridulated)

  1. (intransitive) To make a high-pitched chirping, grating, hissing, or squeaking sound, as male crickets and grasshoppers do, by rubbing certain body parts together.
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 191:
      A window was open, and the crickets were stridulating at an ominous speed in the black motionless foliage.
    • 1984, John Updike, The Witches of Eastwick, p55
      The crickets stridulated their everlasting monotonous meaningful note.
    Synonyms: chirp, chirr

Related terms

Translations


Italian

Verb

stridulate

  1. inflection of stridulare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Participle

stridulate

  1. feminine plural of the past participle of stridulare

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