clobber vs lick what difference

what is difference between clobber and lick

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈklɒb.ə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈklɑb.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒbə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: clob‧ber

Etymology 1

British slang from 1941; possibly onomatopoeic of the sound of detonated bombs in the distance.

Verb

clobber (third-person singular simple present clobbers, present participle clobbering, simple past and past participle clobbered)

  1. (transitive, slang) To hit or bash severely; to seriously harm or damage.
    • 1954, Evan Hunter, The Blackboard Jungle, 1984, page 201,
      So the temptation to clobber was always there, and it was sometimes more difficult not to strike than it would have been to strike, and the consequences be damned.
    • 2000 November 30, Kenya National Assembly Official Record (Hansard), page 3034,
      Mr. Speaker, Sir, in the East African Standard newspaper we saw a picture of a man being carried away after being clobbered. We also saw women being clobbered by well-built policemen using big clubs. They were clobbering women who had already fallen on the ground.
    • The following script cripples the UNIX server by an implosion of incoming jobs. This is known as a denial of service (DOS) attack [] .
  2. (transitive, computing, slang) To overwrite (data) or override (an assignment of a value), often unintentionally or unexpectedly.
    • 1999, Michael J. Wooldridge, Anand Rao, Foundations of Rational Agency, page 74,
      Inferences made in accordance with this reason are defeated by finding that the merged plan clobbers one of the causal-links in one of the constituent plans.
    • 2004, John R. Levine, Margaret Levine Young, Unix for Dummies, page 314,
      The cp command does one thing as it clobbers a file; mv and ln do another.
    • 2007, Billy Hoffman, Bryan Sullivan, Ajax Security, unnumbered page,
      These functions collide, and we can see in Figure 7-1 that the debug() function for SexyWidgets clobbers the developer′s debug() function. The last function declared with the same name in the same scope will silently clobber the earlier function definition.

Noun

clobber (uncountable)

  1. (slang) A thumping or beating.
    • 2014, Philippa Ballantine, Weather Child
      He should have stepped back and given Hemi room to chat and see where the women was going, yet he found himself drawn over to them. His friend would probably give him a clobber later on for his stupidity []
  2. A bash on say the head, typically with a tool or object rather than with fists.
Translations

Etymology 2

British slang from 19th century.
(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

clobber (uncountable)

  1. (Australia, Britain, slang) Clothing; clothes.
    • 1919, C. J. Dennis, Red Robin, in Jim of The Hills, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0500931:
      I was thinkin’ of the widow while I gets me clobber on— / Like a feller will start thinkin’ of the times that’s past an’ gone.
  2. (Britain, slang) Equipment.

Etymology 3

Noun

clobber (uncountable)

  1. A paste used by shoemakers to hide the cracks in leather.

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “clobber”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • The Dinkum Dictionary
  • “The Jargon File”, in (please provide the title of the work)[3], (please provide a date or year)

Anagrams

  • Cobbler, cobbler


English

Etymology

From Middle English likken, from Old English liccian, from Proto-West Germanic *likkōn, from Proto-Germanic *likkōną (compare Saterland Frisian likje, Dutch likken, German lecken), from Proto-Indo-European *leyǵʰ- (compare Old Irish ligid, Latin lingō (lick), ligguriō (to lap, lick up), Lithuanian laižyti, Old Church Slavonic лизати (lizati), Ancient Greek λείχω (leíkhō), Old Armenian լիզեմ (lizem), Persian لیسیدن(lisidan), Sanskrit लेढि (léḍhi), रेढि (réḍhi)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Noun

lick (plural licks)

  1. The act of licking; a stroke of the tongue.
  2. The amount of some substance obtainable with a single lick.
  3. A quick and careless application of anything, as if by a stroke of the tongue.
  4. A place where animals lick minerals from the ground.
  5. A small watercourse or ephemeral stream. It ranks between a rill and a stream.
  6. (colloquial) A stroke or blow.
  7. (colloquial) A small amount; a whit.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:modicum
    • 2011 Allen Gregory, “Pilot” (season 1, episode 1):
      Allen Gregory DeLongpre: Why don’t I call Jean-Michel at Il Portofino? We’ll get a table outside? Ooh, I’m not getting a lick of service. Babe, can I hop on your landline?
  8. (informal) An attempt at something.
  9. (music) A short motif.
  10. (informal) A rate of speed. (Always qualified by good, fair, or a similar adjective.)
  11. (slang) An act of cunnilingus.

Translations

Verb

lick (third-person singular simple present licks, present participle licking, simple past and past participle licked)

  1. (transitive) To stroke with the tongue.
  2. (transitive) To lap; to take in with the tongue.
  3. (colloquial) To beat with repeated blows.
  4. (colloquial) To defeat decisively, particularly in a fight.
  5. (colloquial) To overcome.
  6. (vulgar, slang) To perform cunnilingus.
  7. (colloquial) To do anything partially.
  8. (of flame, waves etc.) To lap.
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine Chapter XI
      Now, in this decadent age the art of fire-making had been altogether forgotten on the earth. The red tongues that went licking up my heap of wood were an altogether new and strange thing to Weena.

Translations

Derived terms


Yola

Etymology

From Middle English liken, from Old English līcian, from Proto-West Germanic *līkēn.

Verb

lick

  1. like

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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