clobber vs stuff what difference

what is difference between clobber and stuff

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈklɒb.ə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈklɑb.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒbə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: clob‧ber

Etymology 1

British slang from 1941; possibly onomatopoeic of the sound of detonated bombs in the distance.

Verb

clobber (third-person singular simple present clobbers, present participle clobbering, simple past and past participle clobbered)

  1. (transitive, slang) To hit or bash severely; to seriously harm or damage.
    • 1954, Evan Hunter, The Blackboard Jungle, 1984, page 201,
      So the temptation to clobber was always there, and it was sometimes more difficult not to strike than it would have been to strike, and the consequences be damned.
    • 2000 November 30, Kenya National Assembly Official Record (Hansard), page 3034,
      Mr. Speaker, Sir, in the East African Standard newspaper we saw a picture of a man being carried away after being clobbered. We also saw women being clobbered by well-built policemen using big clubs. They were clobbering women who had already fallen on the ground.
    • The following script cripples the UNIX server by an implosion of incoming jobs. This is known as a denial of service (DOS) attack [] .
  2. (transitive, computing, slang) To overwrite (data) or override (an assignment of a value), often unintentionally or unexpectedly.
    • 1999, Michael J. Wooldridge, Anand Rao, Foundations of Rational Agency, page 74,
      Inferences made in accordance with this reason are defeated by finding that the merged plan clobbers one of the causal-links in one of the constituent plans.
    • 2004, John R. Levine, Margaret Levine Young, Unix for Dummies, page 314,
      The cp command does one thing as it clobbers a file; mv and ln do another.
    • 2007, Billy Hoffman, Bryan Sullivan, Ajax Security, unnumbered page,
      These functions collide, and we can see in Figure 7-1 that the debug() function for SexyWidgets clobbers the developer′s debug() function. The last function declared with the same name in the same scope will silently clobber the earlier function definition.

Noun

clobber (uncountable)

  1. (slang) A thumping or beating.
    • 2014, Philippa Ballantine, Weather Child
      He should have stepped back and given Hemi room to chat and see where the women was going, yet he found himself drawn over to them. His friend would probably give him a clobber later on for his stupidity []
  2. A bash on say the head, typically with a tool or object rather than with fists.
Translations

Etymology 2

British slang from 19th century.
(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

clobber (uncountable)

  1. (Australia, Britain, slang) Clothing; clothes.
    • 1919, C. J. Dennis, Red Robin, in Jim of The Hills, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0500931:
      I was thinkin’ of the widow while I gets me clobber on— / Like a feller will start thinkin’ of the times that’s past an’ gone.
  2. (Britain, slang) Equipment.

Etymology 3

Noun

clobber (uncountable)

  1. A paste used by shoemakers to hide the cracks in leather.

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “clobber”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • The Dinkum Dictionary
  • “The Jargon File”, in (please provide the title of the work)[3], (please provide a date or year)

Anagrams

  • Cobbler, cobbler


English

Etymology

From Middle English stuffen (to equip, furnish), borrowed from Old French estoffer, estofer (to provide what is necessary, equip, stuff), borrowed from Old High German stoffōn, from Proto-West Germanic *stoppōn (to clog up, block, fill). More at stop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stʌf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf

Noun

stuff (usually uncountable, plural stuffs)

  1. (informal) Miscellaneous items or objects; (with possessive) personal effects.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He’d never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn’t run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn’t swear he knew his face.
    1. (obsolete, uncountable) Furniture; goods; domestic vessels or utensils.
      • 1630, John Hayward, The Life and Raigne of King Edward VI,
        He took away locks, and gave away the king’s stuff.
  2. (informal) Unspecified things or matters.
  3. The tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object — as for example breadstuff into bread, or (more figuratively) the right stuff into an astronaut.
    Synonyms: matter, ingredients, constituents; see also Thesaurus:substance
    • 1697, John Davies, A Poem on the Immortality of the Soul
      The workman on his stuff his skill doth show, / And yet the stuff gives not the man his skill.
    1. (archaic) A material for making clothing; any woven textile, but especially a woollen fabric.
      • 1857, The National Magazine (volumes 10-11, page 350)
        “And you can buy a dress for your wife off this piece of stuff,” said Lisetta, who had always an eye to business.
      • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, p.147:
        She was going out to buy some lengths of good woollen stuff for Louise’s winter dresses.
    2. (archaic) Boards used for building.
    3. Abstract/figurative substance or character.
      • c.1599, William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act 3, scene 2, 91–94:
        When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept; / Ambition should be made of sterner stuff
      • c.1610, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 4, scene 1, 156–157:
        We are such stuff / As dreams are made on
    4. Paper stock ground ready for use. When partly ground, it is called half stuff.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  4. (informal) Used as placeholder, usually for material of unknown type or name.
    Synonyms: doodad, thingamabob; see also Thesaurus:thingy
  5. (slang) Narcotic drugs, especially heroin.
    Synonyms: dope, gear; see also Thesaurus:recreational drug
    • 1947, William Burroughs, letter, 11 March:
      For some idiotic reason the bureaucrats are more opposed to tea than to stuff.
    • 1975, Mary Sanches, Ben G. Blount, Sociocultural Dimensions of Language Use (page 47)
      For example, one addict would crack shorts (break and enter cars) and usually obtain just enough stolen goods to buy stuff and get off just before getting sick.
  6. (obsolete) A medicine or mixture; a potion.
  7. (sometimes euphemistic) Refuse or worthless matter; hence, also, foolish or irrational language; nonsense; trash.
    Synonyms: garbage, rubbish; see also Thesaurus:trash
    • Anger would indite / Such woeful stuff as I or Shadwell write.
  8. (nautical) A melted mass of turpentine, tallow, etc., with which the masts, sides, and bottom of a ship are smeared for lubrication.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ham. Nav. Encyc to this entry?)
  9. (slang, criminal argot, dated) Money.

Usage notes

  • The textile sense is increasingly specialized and sounds dated in everyday contexts. In the UK & Commonwealth it designates the cloth from which legal and academic gowns are made, except for the gowns of Queen’s/King’s/State Counsel, which are (often in contradistinction) made of silk.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

stuff (third-person singular simple present stuffs, present participle stuffing, simple past and past participle stuffed)

  1. (transitive) To fill by packing or crowding something into; to cram with something; to load to excess.
    I’m going to stuff this pillow with feathers.
    • Lest the gods, for sin, / Should with a swelling dropsy stuff thy skin.
  2. (transitive) To fill a space with (something) in a compressed manner.
    • 1922, Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit
      The Rabbit could not claim to be a model of anything, for he didn’t know that real rabbits existed; he thought they were all stuffed with sawdust like himself, and he understood that sawdust was quite out-of-date and should never be mentioned in modern circles.
  3. (Should we delete(+) this redundant sense?) (transitive, cooking) To fill with seasoning.
  4. (transitive) To load goods into (a container) for transport.
  5. (transitive, used in the passive) To sate.
  6. (takes a reflexive pronoun) To eat, especially in a hearty or greedy manner.
    Synonyms: fill one’s face, feed one’s face, stuff one’s face
    She sits on the sofa all day, watching TV and stuffing herself with cream buns.
  7. (transitive, Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To break; to destroy.
  8. (transitive, vulgar, Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To sexually penetrate.
    Synonyms: fuck, root, screw
    His wife came home early and found him on the couch stuffing the maid.
  9. (transitive, mildly vulgar, often imperative) Used to contemptuously dismiss or reject something. See also stuff it.
  10. (informal) To heavily defeat or get the better of.
    Mudchester Rovers were stuffed 7-0 in the semi-final.
    They totally stuffed us in that business deal.
  11. (transitive) To cut off another competitor in a race by disturbing his projected and committed racing line (trajectory) by an abrupt manoeuvre.
  12. To preserve a dead bird or other animal by filling its skin.
  13. (transitive) To obstruct, as any of the organs; to affect with some obstruction in the organs of sense or respiration.
  14. (Should we delete(+) this redundant sense?) (transitive) To form or fashion by packing with the necessary material.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 5
      An Eastern king put a judge to death for an iniquitous sentence, and ordered his hide to be stuffed into a cushion, and placed upon the tribunal.
  15. (transitive, dated) To crowd with facts; to cram the mind of; sometimes, to crowd or fill with false or idle tales or fancies.
  16. (transitive, computing) To compress (a file or files) in the StuffIt format, to be unstuffed later.

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • stuff at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • stuff in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Tuffs, tuffs

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