clop vs plunk what difference

what is difference between clop and plunk

English

Etymology

Perhaps from German or Dutch kloppen (to hit, knock), from Middle Dutch cloppen (to make a clopping sound), of onomatopoeic origin. See also clap.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /klɒp/
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Noun

clop (plural clops)

  1. (onomatopoeia) The sound of a horse’s shod hoof striking the ground.
  2. (slang) My Little Pony-themed pornography

Derived terms

  • clopper (#2 only)

Translations

Verb

clop (third-person singular simple present clops, present participle clopping, simple past and past participle clopped)

  1. To make this sound; to walk so as to make this sound.
  2. (slang) To masturbate to My Little Pony-themed pornography.

Anagrams

  • CPOL, OLPC, colp, ploc

Old French

Etymology

From Late Latin cloppus.

Adjective

clop m (oblique and nominative feminine singular clope)

  1. hobbling; limping

Declension


Romanian

Etymology

From Hungarian kalap

Noun

clop n (plural clopuri)

  1. (Transylvania, Banat) hat

Declension



English

Etymology

Onomatopoeic. Compare flump.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plʌŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋk

Verb

plunk (third-person singular simple present plunks, present participle plunking, simple past and past participle plunked)

  1. (transitive) To drop or throw something heavily onto or into something else, so that it makes a dull sound.
    Synonyms: flump, thud
  2. (intransitive) To land suddenly or heavily; to plump down.
  3. (transitive, baseball) To intentionally hit the batter with a pitch.
  4. (intransitive, of a raven) To croak.
  5. (transitive, music) To pluck and quickly release (a musical string).
    Synonym: twang
    • 2011, Dave Eggers, Guillermo del Toro, The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2011, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (→ISBN), page 452
  6. (transitive, intransitive, Scotland) To be a truant from (school).

Noun

plunk (plural plunks)

  1. The dull thud of something landing on a surface.
  2. (slang, obsolete) A large sum of money.
  3. (slang, obsolete, US) A dollar.

Derived terms

  • kerplunk

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