clothe vs invest what difference

what is difference between clothe and invest

English

Alternative forms

  • cloathe (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English clothen, from Old English clāþian (to clothe), from Proto-Germanic *klaiþōną (to clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *gley- (to adhere to, stick). Cognate with Dutch kleden, German kleiden, Swedish kläda, after apocope klä. See also cloth, clad.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkləʊð/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkloʊð/
  • Rhymes: -əʊð

Verb

clothe (third-person singular simple present clothes, present participle clothing, simple past and past participle clothed or (archaic) clad)

  1. (transitive) To adorn or cover with clothing; to dress; to supply clothes or clothing.
    • 1478, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue, 101-104, [1]
      A YEMAN hadde he and servantz namo / At that tyme, for hym liste ride soo; / And he was clad in cote and hood of grene.
  2. (figuratively) To cover or invest, as if with a garment.
    • language in which they can clothe their thoughts
    • 1726, John Dyer, Grongar Hill
      His sides are clothed with waving wood.

Synonyms

  • (to adorn or cover with clothing): dight, don, put on; see also Thesaurus:clothe

Derived terms

  • beclothe
  • overclothe
  • underclothe

Translations


Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English clāþ.

Noun

clothe

  1. Alternative form of cloth

Etymology 2

From Old English clāþian.

Verb

clothe

  1. Alternative form of clothen


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈvɛst/
  • Rhymes: -ɛst

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle French investir or Medieval Latin investire, from Latin investio (to clothe, cover), from in- (in, on) + vestio (to clothe, dress), from vestis (clothing); see vest. The sense “to spend money etc.” probably via Italian investire, of the same root.

Verb

invest (third-person singular simple present invests, present participle investing, simple past and past participle invested)

  1. To spend money, time, or energy on something, especially for some benefit or purpose; used with in.
  2. (transitive, dated) To clothe or wrap (with garments).
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) To put on (clothing).
  4. To envelop, wrap, cover.
  5. To commit money or capital in the hope of financial gain.
  6. To ceremonially install someone in some office.
  7. To formally give (someone) some power or authority.
  8. To formally give (power or authority).
  9. To surround, accompany, or attend.
  10. To lay siege to.
  11. (intransitive) To make investments.
  12. (metallurgy) To prepare for lost wax casting by creating an investment mold (a mixture of a silica sand and plaster).
  13. (intransitive) To be involved in; to form strong attachments to.
Synonyms
  • (put on clothing): beclothe, don, dress; see also Thesaurus:clothe
  • (lay siege to): besiege
Antonyms
  • (clothe): divest
  • (give): divest
  • (commit funds): disinvest, divest
Derived terms
Related terms
  • divest
  • vest
  • vestibule
  • vestment
  • vesture
Translations

Etymology 2

From investigate, by shortening

Noun

invest (plural invests)

  1. (meteorology) An unnamed tropical weather pattern “to investigate” for development into a significant (named) system.

References

Anagrams

  • ventis

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial