cod vs collect what difference

what is difference between cod and collect

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kɒd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /kɑd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒd
  • (in General American): Rhymes: -ɑːd
  • Homophone: cawed (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English cod, codde, from Old English cod, codd (bag, pouch), from Proto-Germanic *kuddô, from Proto-Indo-European *gewt- (pouch, sack), from *gew- (to bend, bow, arch, vault, curve). Cognate with Scots cod, codd, coad, kod (pillow, cushion), Low German Koden, Kon (belly, paunch), Middle Dutch codde (scrotum), Danish kodde (testicle), Swedish kudde (cushion), Faroese koddi (pillow), Icelandic koddi (pillow).

Noun

cod (plural cods)

  1. (obsolete) A small bag or pouch.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  2. (Britain, obsolete) A husk or integument; a pod.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke XV:
      And he wolde fayne have filled his bely with the coddes, that the swyne ate: and noo man gave hym.
  3. (now rare) The scrotum (also in plural).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dunglison to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete or Britain dialectal, Scotland) A pillow or cushion.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • codpiece
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English cod, codde, of uncertain origin:

  • Oldest English form cotfich as a surname in the 13th century; for more see cot (chamber, cottage).
  • Same as Etymology 1, above; a bag or pouch, related to its bloated shape.
  • From Latin gadus, from Ancient Greek γάδος (gádos, fish) with a possible pre-Greek or Semitic origin; for more see Atargatis, Cetus, and κῆτος (kêtos).

Noun

cod (usually uncountable, plural cod or cods)

  1. The Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.
  2. The sea fish of the genus Gadus generally, as inclusive of the Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) and Greenland cod (Gadus ogac or Gadus macrocephalus ogac).
  3. The sea fish of the family Gadidae which are sold as “cod”, as haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and whiting (usually Merlangius merlangus).
  4. (informal, usually with qualifiers) Other unrelated fish which are similarly important to regional fisheries, as the hapuku and cultus cod.
  5. (informal, usually with qualifiers) Other unrelated fish which resemble the Atlantic cod, as the rock cod (Lotella rhacina) and blue cod (Parapercis colias).
Usage notes

The term Atlantic cod is now used where it is desired to distinguish the other members of Gadus or the Gadidae. Similar qualifiers are used to distinguish the other members, as well as the unrelated fish in the term’s other senses. The plural form cod has become more common than the form cods.

Synonyms
  • (Atlantic cod): milwell (many variants), Scotch cod, common cod
  • (other Gadus spp., esp. Pacific cod): gray cod, grey cod, grayfish, greyfish; (Greenland cod) ogac
  • (unrelated fish marketed as cod): haddock, whiting
  • (similarly important local species): hapuku
  • (unrelated similar species): rock cod, rockcod, beardie (Lotella rhacina); cod icefish (the Nototheniidae); marbled rockcod (Notothenia rossii); emerald rockcod (Trematomus bernacchii); honeycomb rockcod, dwarf spotted rockcod (Epinephelus merra), Maori cod, Magellanic rockcod, blue notothenia, orange throat notothen (Paranotothenia magellanica), brown spotted reef cod, brownspotted grouper (Epinephelus chlorostigma), red rock cod, vermilion rockcod (Scorpaena papillosa); red snapper (Lutjanus spp.); vermilion seaperch, vermilion rockfish (Sebastes miniatus); grouper (the Serranidae); thornyhead (Sebastidae)
Hypernyms
  • Anacanthini
  • demersal
  • Gadiformes
  • whitefish
Hyponyms
  • (young): codling
  • (small, obsolete): morhwell
  • (consumed codlings): scrod
  • (air-dried, unsalted): stockfish
  • (freshly-salted): greenfish, green fish, green cod, white cod
  • (dried & salted): clipfish, salt cod, dry cod, ling, haberdine
  • (cured in lye): lutefisk
  • (pancakes): bacalaito
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Origin unknown. Attested in reference to a person (though not always a stupid or foolish person) from the end of the 17th century. The Oxford English Dictionary (1891) notes that a suggested link to codger is unlikely, as cod appears much earlier.

Noun

cod (plural cods)

  1. A joke or an imitation.
  2. A stupid or foolish person.

Adjective

cod (comparative more cod, superlative most cod)

  1. Having the character of imitation; jocular. (now usually attributive, forming mostly compound adjectives).
  2. (Polari) Bad.
Synonyms
  • (imitation): faux, mock
  • (bad): See Thesaurus:bad
Antonyms
  • (bad): bona (Polari)
  • (bad): See Thesaurus:bad
Derived terms
  • (bad): cody, coddy (bad, amateurish)
Translations

Verb

cod (third-person singular simple present cods, present participle codding, simple past and past participle codded)

  1. (slang, transitive, dialectal) To attempt to deceive or confuse.

See also

  • codswallop

Anagrams

  • CDO, DOC, Doc, OCD, ODC, doc, doc.

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English codd (bag, pouch), from Proto-Germanic *kuddô, from Proto-Indo-European *gewt- (pouch, sack), from *gew- (to bend, bow, arch, vault, curve). The “pillow” sense is from Old Danish kodde or Old Norse koddi, from the same Proto-Germanic source.

Alternative forms

  • codde, kode, code

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔd(ə)/

Noun

cod (plural coddes)

  1. A seedpod; a plant’s natural casing for its seeds.
  2. A scrotum, ballsack; a case for the testicles.
  3. A pillow or cushion; a piece of cushioning.
  4. (rare) A sack or pouch; a case for items.
  5. (rare) The gullet, windpipe or esophagus.
  6. (rare) The chest or stomach region.
  7. (rare) A ball bearing; a metal ball acting to cushion.
Derived terms
  • pesecod
Descendants
  • English: cod
  • Scots: cod

References

  • “cod, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-04-30.

Etymology 2

Unknown; see English cod.

Alternative forms

  • codde, kotde

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔd/

Noun

cod (plural coddes)

  1. cod, codfish
Descendants
  • English: cod

References

  • “cod, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-04-30.

Romanian

Etymology 1

From French code.

Noun

cod n (plural coduri)

  1. code
Declension

Etymology 2

From English cod.

Noun

cod m (plural cozi)

  1. (zoology) cod
Declension

Scots

Alternative forms

  • codd, coad, kod

Etymology

From Middle English cod, from Old English codd (bag, pouch), from Proto-Germanic *kuddô. The “pillow” sense is from Old Danish kodde or Old Norse koddi, from the same Proto-Germanic source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔd/

Noun

cod (plural cods)

  1. A pillow or cushion.
  2. A seedpod; a plant’s natural casing for its seeds.

Welsh

Etymology

From English code

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /koːd/

Noun

cod m (plural codau)

  1. code

Derived terms

  • amgodio (to encode)
  • cod agored (open source)
  • cod bar (barcode)
  • cod ffynhonnell (source code)
  • cod genynnol (genetic code)
  • cod gwisg (dress code)
  • Cod Penyd (Penal Code)
  • cod post (postcode)
  • cod lliwiau (colour code)
  • cod moesol (moral code)
  • cod nodau (character code)
  • cod ymarfer (code of practice)
  • cod ymddygiad (code of conduct)
  • codio (to code)
  • codydd (coder)

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cod”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English collecten, a borrowing from Old French collecter, from Medieval Latin collectare (to collect money), from Latin collecta (a collection of money, in Late Latin a meeting, assemblage, in Medieval Latin a tax, also an assembly for prayer, a prayer), feminine of collectus, past participle of colligere, conligere (to gather together, collect, consider, conclude, infer), from com- (together) + legere (to gather).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kəˈlɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Verb

collect (third-person singular simple present collects, present participle collecting, simple past and past participle collected)

  1. (transitive) To gather together; amass.
  2. (transitive) To get; particularly, get from someone.
  3. (transitive) To accumulate (a number of similar or related objects), particularly for a hobby or recreation.
  4. (transitive, now rare) To form a conclusion; to deduce, infer. (Compare gather, get.)
    • 1690, John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book II, Chapter XVII, section 20
      [] which consequence, I conceive, is very ill collected.
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, page 292-3:
      the riot is so great that it is very difficult to collect what is being said.
  5. (intransitive, often with on or against) To collect payments.
  6. (intransitive) To come together in a group or mass.
  7. (transitive) To infer; to conclude.
    • Whence some collect that the former word imports a plurality of persons.
  8. (transitive, of a vehicle or driver) To collide with or crash into (another vehicle or obstacle).
    The truck veered across the central reservation and collected a car that was travelling in the opposite direction.

Synonyms

  • (to gather together): aggregate, gather up; see also Thesaurus:round up
  • (to get from someone): receive, secure; see also Thesaurus:receive
  • (to accumulate items for a hobby): amound, gather; see also Thesaurus:accumulate
  • (to infer, conclude, form a conclusion): assume, construe
  • (to collect payments):
  • (to come together in a group or mass): group, mass, merge; see also Thesaurus:assemble or Thesaurus:coalesce
  • (to collide with): bump into, plough into, run into
Hyponyms
  • garbage collect
Translations

Adjective

collect (not comparable)

  1. To be paid for by the recipient, as a telephone call or a shipment.
Translations

Adverb

collect (not comparable)

  1. With payment due from the recipient.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Latin ōrātiō ad collectam (prayer towards the congregation).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑlɪkt/, /ˈkɑlɛkt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒlɪkt/

Noun

collect (plural collects) (sometimes capitalized)

  1. (Christianity) The prayer said before the reading of the epistle lesson, especially one found in a prayerbook, as with the Book of Common Prayer.
Translations

Further reading

  • collect in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • collect in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • collect at OneLook Dictionary Search

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