cod vs gull what difference

what is difference between cod and gull

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kɒd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /kɑd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒd
  • (in General American): Rhymes: -ɑːd
  • Homophone: cawed (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English cod, codde, from Old English cod, codd (bag, pouch), from Proto-Germanic *kuddô, from Proto-Indo-European *gewt- (pouch, sack), from *gew- (to bend, bow, arch, vault, curve). Cognate with Scots cod, codd, coad, kod (pillow, cushion), Low German Koden, Kon (belly, paunch), Middle Dutch codde (scrotum), Danish kodde (testicle), Swedish kudde (cushion), Faroese koddi (pillow), Icelandic koddi (pillow).

Noun

cod (plural cods)

  1. (obsolete) A small bag or pouch.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  2. (Britain, obsolete) A husk or integument; a pod.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke XV:
      And he wolde fayne have filled his bely with the coddes, that the swyne ate: and noo man gave hym.
  3. (now rare) The scrotum (also in plural).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dunglison to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete or Britain dialectal, Scotland) A pillow or cushion.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • codpiece
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English cod, codde, of uncertain origin:

  • Oldest English form cotfich as a surname in the 13th century; for more see cot (chamber, cottage).
  • Same as Etymology 1, above; a bag or pouch, related to its bloated shape.
  • From Latin gadus, from Ancient Greek γάδος (gádos, fish) with a possible pre-Greek or Semitic origin; for more see Atargatis, Cetus, and κῆτος (kêtos).

Noun

cod (usually uncountable, plural cod or cods)

  1. The Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.
  2. The sea fish of the genus Gadus generally, as inclusive of the Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) and Greenland cod (Gadus ogac or Gadus macrocephalus ogac).
  3. The sea fish of the family Gadidae which are sold as “cod”, as haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and whiting (usually Merlangius merlangus).
  4. (informal, usually with qualifiers) Other unrelated fish which are similarly important to regional fisheries, as the hapuku and cultus cod.
  5. (informal, usually with qualifiers) Other unrelated fish which resemble the Atlantic cod, as the rock cod (Lotella rhacina) and blue cod (Parapercis colias).
Usage notes

The term Atlantic cod is now used where it is desired to distinguish the other members of Gadus or the Gadidae. Similar qualifiers are used to distinguish the other members, as well as the unrelated fish in the term’s other senses. The plural form cod has become more common than the form cods.

Synonyms
  • (Atlantic cod): milwell (many variants), Scotch cod, common cod
  • (other Gadus spp., esp. Pacific cod): gray cod, grey cod, grayfish, greyfish; (Greenland cod) ogac
  • (unrelated fish marketed as cod): haddock, whiting
  • (similarly important local species): hapuku
  • (unrelated similar species): rock cod, rockcod, beardie (Lotella rhacina); cod icefish (the Nototheniidae); marbled rockcod (Notothenia rossii); emerald rockcod (Trematomus bernacchii); honeycomb rockcod, dwarf spotted rockcod (Epinephelus merra), Maori cod, Magellanic rockcod, blue notothenia, orange throat notothen (Paranotothenia magellanica), brown spotted reef cod, brownspotted grouper (Epinephelus chlorostigma), red rock cod, vermilion rockcod (Scorpaena papillosa); red snapper (Lutjanus spp.); vermilion seaperch, vermilion rockfish (Sebastes miniatus); grouper (the Serranidae); thornyhead (Sebastidae)
Hypernyms
  • Anacanthini
  • demersal
  • Gadiformes
  • whitefish
Hyponyms
  • (young): codling
  • (small, obsolete): morhwell
  • (consumed codlings): scrod
  • (air-dried, unsalted): stockfish
  • (freshly-salted): greenfish, green fish, green cod, white cod
  • (dried & salted): clipfish, salt cod, dry cod, ling, haberdine
  • (cured in lye): lutefisk
  • (pancakes): bacalaito
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Origin unknown. Attested in reference to a person (though not always a stupid or foolish person) from the end of the 17th century. The Oxford English Dictionary (1891) notes that a suggested link to codger is unlikely, as cod appears much earlier.

Noun

cod (plural cods)

  1. A joke or an imitation.
  2. A stupid or foolish person.

Adjective

cod (comparative more cod, superlative most cod)

  1. Having the character of imitation; jocular. (now usually attributive, forming mostly compound adjectives).
  2. (Polari) Bad.
Synonyms
  • (imitation): faux, mock
  • (bad): See Thesaurus:bad
Antonyms
  • (bad): bona (Polari)
  • (bad): See Thesaurus:bad
Derived terms
  • (bad): cody, coddy (bad, amateurish)
Translations

Verb

cod (third-person singular simple present cods, present participle codding, simple past and past participle codded)

  1. (slang, transitive, dialectal) To attempt to deceive or confuse.

See also

  • codswallop

Anagrams

  • CDO, DOC, Doc, OCD, ODC, doc, doc.

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English codd (bag, pouch), from Proto-Germanic *kuddô, from Proto-Indo-European *gewt- (pouch, sack), from *gew- (to bend, bow, arch, vault, curve). The “pillow” sense is from Old Danish kodde or Old Norse koddi, from the same Proto-Germanic source.

Alternative forms

  • codde, kode, code

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔd(ə)/

Noun

cod (plural coddes)

  1. A seedpod; a plant’s natural casing for its seeds.
  2. A scrotum, ballsack; a case for the testicles.
  3. A pillow or cushion; a piece of cushioning.
  4. (rare) A sack or pouch; a case for items.
  5. (rare) The gullet, windpipe or esophagus.
  6. (rare) The chest or stomach region.
  7. (rare) A ball bearing; a metal ball acting to cushion.
Derived terms
  • pesecod
Descendants
  • English: cod
  • Scots: cod

References

  • “cod, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-04-30.

Etymology 2

Unknown; see English cod.

Alternative forms

  • codde, kotde

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔd/

Noun

cod (plural coddes)

  1. cod, codfish
Descendants
  • English: cod

References

  • “cod, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-04-30.

Romanian

Etymology 1

From French code.

Noun

cod n (plural coduri)

  1. code
Declension

Etymology 2

From English cod.

Noun

cod m (plural cozi)

  1. (zoology) cod
Declension

Scots

Alternative forms

  • codd, coad, kod

Etymology

From Middle English cod, from Old English codd (bag, pouch), from Proto-Germanic *kuddô. The “pillow” sense is from Old Danish kodde or Old Norse koddi, from the same Proto-Germanic source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔd/

Noun

cod (plural cods)

  1. A pillow or cushion.
  2. A seedpod; a plant’s natural casing for its seeds.

Welsh

Etymology

From English code

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /koːd/

Noun

cod m (plural codau)

  1. code

Derived terms

  • amgodio (to encode)
  • cod agored (open source)
  • cod bar (barcode)
  • cod ffynhonnell (source code)
  • cod genynnol (genetic code)
  • cod gwisg (dress code)
  • Cod Penyd (Penal Code)
  • cod post (postcode)
  • cod lliwiau (colour code)
  • cod moesol (moral code)
  • cod nodau (character code)
  • cod ymarfer (code of practice)
  • cod ymddygiad (code of conduct)
  • codio (to code)
  • codydd (coder)

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cod”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gŭl, IPA(key): /ˈɡʌl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌl

Etymology 1

From Middle English gulle, from a Brythonic language, from Proto-Brythonic *gwuɨlann, from Proto-Celtic *wēlannā (seagull). Cognate with Welsh gwylan, Cornish goolan, Breton gouelan, Old Irish faílenn. Compare French goéland, a borrowing from Breton.

Noun

gull (plural gulls)

  1. A seabird of the genus Larus or of the family Laridae.
  2. Any of various pierid butterflies of the genus Cepora.
Synonyms
  • (seabird): mew, seamew, seagull
Derived terms
  • Audouin’s gull (Ichthyaetus ichthyaetus)
  • black-headed gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
  • Bonaparte’s gull (Chroicocephalus philadelphia)
  • Caspian gull (Larus cachinnans)
  • common gull (Larus canus)
  • Dominican gull (Larus dominicanus)
  • flood gull (Rynchops nigra)
  • Franklin’s gull (Leucophaeus pipixcan)
  • glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus)
  • great black-backed gull (Larus marinus)
  • gull-billed tern (Gelochelidon nilotica)
  • gull chaser (Stercorarius pomarius)
  • gullfeed (Scaevola plumieri)
  • herring gull (Larus spp.)
  • Iceland gull (Larus glaucoides)
  • ivory gull (Pagophila eburnea)
  • kelp gull (Larus dominicanus)
  • lesser black-backed gull (Larus fuscus)
  • land gull (Larus marinus)
  • laughing gull (Xema ridibundus, Leucophaeus atricilla)
  • little gull (Larus minutus)
  • Mediterranean gull (Ichthyaetus melanocephalus)
  • mew gull (Larus canus)
  • Pacific gull (Larus pacificus)
  • Pallas’s gull (Ichthyaetus ichthyaetus)
  • red-billed gull (Chroicocephalus scopulinus)
  • ring-billed gull (Larus delawarensis)
  • Ross’s gull (Rhodostethia rosea)
  • Sabine’s gull (Xema sabini)
  • seagull (Laridae spp.)
  • silver gull (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae)
  • slaty-backed gull (Larus schistisagus)
  • slender-billed gull (Chroicocephalus genei)
  • white-eyed gull (Ichthyaetus leucophthalmus)
  • yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis)
Translations

Etymology 2

Perhaps from an obsolete term gull (swallow).

Noun

gull (plural gulls)

  1. (slang) A cheating trick; a fraud.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2 Scene 3
      BENEDICK. [Aside] I should think this a gull, but that the white-bearded fellow speaks it: knavery cannot, sure, hide itself in such reverence.
  2. One easily cheated; a dupe.
  3. (obsolete, Oxford University slang) A swindler or trickster.
Synonyms
  • (dupe): See also Thesaurus:dupe
  • (swindler): See also Thesaurus:fraudster

Verb

gull (third-person singular simple present gulls, present participle gulling, simple past and past participle gulled)

  1. To deceive or cheat.
    • O, but to ha’ gulled him / Had been a mastery.
    • 1660, John Dryden, Astraea Redux
      The vulgar, gulled into rebellion, armed.
    • c. 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Wallenstein
      I’m not gulling him for the emperor’s service.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act IV, Scene I, verse 162-165
      [] speak your curses out
      Against me, who would sooner crush and grind
      A brace of toads, than league with them to oppress
      An innocent lady, gull an Emperor []
  2. (US, slang) To mislead.
  3. (US, slang) To trick and defraud.
Synonyms
  • (to deceive): See also Thesaurus:deceive
Derived terms
  • gullcatcher
  • gullible
  • gullibility
Translations

References

Further reading

  • gull on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Larus on Wikispecies.Wikispecies

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʊtl/

Noun

gull n (genitive singular guls, uncountable)

  1. gold
  2. (in proverbs) richness, money, livestock
  3. gold medal, first place (sports, etc.)

Declension


Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse gull (gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʏtl/
  • Rhymes: -ʏtl

Noun

gull n (genitive singular gulls, nominative plural gull)

  1. (uncountable) gold (chemical element)
  2. (countable) a cherished thing
  3. (countable) a gold medal or prize

Declension

Derived terms

  • ekki er allt gull sem glóir
  • glópagull
  • gull af manni
  • morgunstund gefur gull í mund

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʉlː/

Noun

gull n (definite singular gullet, uncountable)

  1. gold

Derived terms

Related terms

  • forgylle, forgylt

References

  • “gull” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse gull and goll, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą. Akin to English gold.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʉlː/

Noun

gull n (definite singular gullet, uncountable)

  1. gold

Derived terms

References

  • “gull” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Alternative forms

  • goll

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold). Cognate with Old English gold, Old Frisian gold, Old Saxon gold, Old Dutch golt, Old High German gold, Gothic ???????????????? (gulþ). See also Finnish kulta. Ultimately from Pre-Germanic *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃- (yellow; gleam; to shine).

Pronunciation

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ˈɡulː/

Noun

gull n (genitive gulls, plural gull)

  1. (uncountable, singular only) gold
    • Laurentius saga 65, in 1858, Jón_Sigurðsson, Guðbrandur_Vigfússon, Biskupa sögur, Volume I. Copenhagen, page 877:
      Vér viljum ok gefa þér gull vort, []
      We also want to give you our gold, []
  2. (countable) a jewel, thing of value, especially a finger-ring
    • Stjórn 78, in 1862, C. R. Unger, Stjórn: gammelnorsk Bibelhistorie: fra Verdens Skabelse til det babyloniske Fangenskab. Christiania, page 254:
      Enn þegar sem hon bar þetta gull, []
      But when she wore that ring, []

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • gull in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gull in An Icelandic-English Dictionary, R. Cleasby and G. Vigfússon, Clarendon Press, 1874, at Internet Archive.
  • gull in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Swedish

Alternative forms

  • guld (modern form)

Etymology

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Noun

gull n

  1. (poetic, archaic) gold
    Har du silver har du gull, / har du kistorna full?

    Do you have silver and gold, / are your treasure chests full? (song lyrics)
    Wilt thw wara tik sielffuir hull, / tw älska friiheet meer än gull (Old Swedish, poem by bishop Tomas, 1439)

    Vill du vara dig själver huld, / du älska frihet mer än guld (translated to standard Swedish)

    If you want to help yourself, you should love freedom more than gold
  2. (colloquial) baby, darling, someone dear and cute (gullig), someone to cuddle (gulla med)
    mina små gull

    my little darlings
    Kom nu gullet, det är finfint väder ute

    Come on baby, it’s a perfect sunny day

Usage notes

  • The form gull is archaic or poetic outside compound words and fixed expressions, where it has taken the sense of beloved or favorable as in gullgosse (golden boy), gullegris (darling, pet), gullunge (beloved child), etc.

Declension


Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse gull, goll, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Noun

gull n (definite gullä)

  1. (uncountable) gold

Derived terms

  • gullfinger
  • gullskre
  • gulltypp
  • gyllerfeinger

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