cognation vs consanguinity what difference

what is difference between cognation and consanguinity

English

Etymology

From Latin cognātiō; equivalent to cognate +‎ -ion.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɒɡˈneɪʃən/, /kəɡˈneɪʃən/

Noun

cognation (countable and uncountable, plural cognations)

  1. (now chiefly linguistics) A cognate relationship.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book II, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 54:
      … these stones, I say, gratifie our sight, as having a nearer cognation with the Soul of Man, that is Rational and Intellectual, and therefore is well pleased when it meets with any outward Object that fits and agrees with those congenite Ideas her own nature is furnished with.

Anagrams

  • contagion


English

Etymology

From Middle English consanguinytee, consanguinite, consanguinyte, from Old French consanguinité and Latin cōnsanguinitātem, accusative of Latin cōnsanguinitās, from cōnsanguineus, from Latin com- (together) + sanguineus (of or pertaining to blood), from Latin sanguis (blood).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɒnsaŋˈɡwɪnɪti/, /kɒnsaŋˈɡwɪnəti/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɑnsæŋˈɡwɪnɪti/, /kɑnsæŋˈɡwɪnəti/

Noun

consanguinity (countable and uncountable, plural consanguinities)

  1. A consanguineous or family relationship through parentage or descent. A blood relationship.
    • 1776, United States Declaration of Independence
      They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity.

Synonyms

  • same-bloodedness

Related terms

  • consanguineous
  • consanguinuity

Translations

See also

  • affinity
  • incest

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