coiffe vs dress what difference

what is difference between coiffe and dress

English

Verb

coiffe (third-person singular simple present coiffes, present participle coiffing, simple past and past participle coiffed)

  1. Alternative spelling of coif

Anagrams

  • off-ice, office

French

Etymology

From Middle French coiffe, from Late Latin cofia, from Old High German *kuffia, *kuphia (little cap), diminutive of Old High German kuffa, kupha (hood, cap), from Proto-West Germanic *kuppu (round object, bowl) (see English cop). See also Middle High German kupfe (cap), Old High German kupphia (cap); also spelled coeffe up to the 18th century

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kwaf/

Noun

coiffe f (plural coiffes)

  1. coif (headgear in general)

Usage notes

This word, except to describe folk or historical dresses, is obsolete and replaced with coiffure, chapeau, etc.

Verb

coiffe

  1. inflection of coiffer:
    1. first-person singular/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “coiffe” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • office

Middle French

Etymology

From Late Latin cofia, from West Germanic origin, from Proto-West Germanic *kuffju.

See also Middle High German kupfe (cap), Old High German kupphia (cap).

Noun

coiffe f (plural coiffes)

  1. coif (item of chain mail headgear)


English

Etymology

From Middle English dressen, from Old French dresser, drescer, drecier (to erect, set up, arrange, dress), from Medieval Latin *directiō, an assumed frequentative, from Latin directus (straight, direct), perfect passive participle of dīrigō (straighten, direct), from dis- (asunder, in pieces, apart, in two) + regō (make straight, rule). See direct.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: drĕs, IPA(key): /dɹɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Verb

dress (third-person singular simple present dresses, present participle dressing, simple past dressed, past participle dressed or (obsolete) drest)

  1. (transitive) To fit out with the necessary clothing; to clothe, put clothes on (something or someone). [from 15thc.]
  2. (intransitive) To clothe oneself; to put on clothes. [from 18thc.]
  3. (sports, transitive, intransitive) To put on the uniform and equipment necessary to play the game.
  4. (intransitive, euphemistic, of a man) To allow the genitals to fall to one side or other within the trousers. [from 20thc.]
  5. (transitive) To prepare (food) for cooking, especially by seasoning it. [from 15thc.]
    • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act IV, Scene 3,[2]
      Here, love; thou seest how diligent I am,
      To dress thy meat myself, and bring it thee:
    • 1595, George Peele, The Old Wives’ Tale, The Malone Society Reprints, 1908, lines 142-143,[3]
      OLD WOMAN. [] he sent all his men out of his Land.
      FROLICKE. Who drest his dinner then?
  6. (obsolete, reflexive, intransitive) To prepare oneself; to make ready. [14th-16thc.]
  7. To adorn, ornament. [from 15thc.]
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Merman
      dressing their hair with the white sea flower
    • 1884, James Anthony Froude, Life of Carlyle
      If he felt obliged to expostulate, he might have dressed his censures in a kinder form.
  8. (nautical) To ornament (a ship) by hoisting the national colours at the peak and mastheads, and setting the jack forward; when “dressed full”, the signal flags and pennants are added.
  9. (transitive, theater, film, television) To prepare (a set) by installing the props, scenery, etc.
    • 2012, Marvin Silbersher, A Fistful of Stars (page 106)
      Mallory, all night long, single-handedly painted and dressed the set so that at eight o’clock Sunday morning when we arrived to make breakfast in the kitchen, there she was sound asleep on the davenport in the set, every prop in place.
  10. (transitive) To treat (a wound, or wounded person). [from 15thc.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.5:
      Daily she dressed him, and did the best / His grievous hurt to guarish, that she might [].
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island:
      [] he was deadly pale, and the blood-stained bandage round his head told that he had recently been wounded, and still more recently dressed.
  11. To prepare for use; to fit for any use; to render suitable for an intended purpose; to get ready.
    to dress leather or cloth;  to dress a garden;  to dress grain, by cleansing it;  in mining and metallurgy, to dress ores, by sorting and separating them
    • When he dresseth the lamps he shall burn incense.
    • three hundred horses [] smoothly dressed
  12. (intransitive, slang) Ellipsis of cross-dress.
  13. (transitive) To prepare the surface of (a material; usually stone or lumber).
  14. (transitive) To manure (land).
  15. (transitive) To bolt or sift flour.
  16. (military, transitive, intransitive, sometimes imperative) To arrange in exact continuity of line, as soldiers; commonly to adjust to a straight line and at proper distance; to align.
    to dress the ranks
    Right, dress!
  17. To break and train for use, as a horse or other animal.

Synonyms

  • (clothe (something or somebody)): clothe, don; see also Thesaurus:clothe
  • (clothe oneself): get dressed
  • (prepare the surface of):
  • (bandage (a wound)): bandage, put a bandage on, put a dressing on

Antonyms

  • (clothe (something or somebody): strip, undress
  • (clothe oneself): disrobe, get undressed, strip, undress

Derived terms

Related terms

  • dressage

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: dresi

Translations

Noun

dress (countable and uncountable, plural dresses)

  1. (countable) An item of clothing (usually worn by a woman or young girl) which both covers the upper part of the body and includes skirts below the waist.
  2. (uncountable) Apparel, clothing.
  3. The system of furrows on the face of a millstone.
  4. A dress rehearsal.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ドレス (doresu)
  • Korean: 드레스 (deureseu)
  • Norwegian: dress
  • Pennsylvania German: Dress
  • Scottish Gaelic: dreasa

Translations

See also

  • ????

Further reading

  • dress on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • dress in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • dress in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • dress at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • “dress”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “dress” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.
  • dress (adjective) in Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From English dress, from Middle English dressen, from Old French dresser, drescer, drecier (to erect, set up, arrange, dress), from either Medieval Latin dīrēctiō (direction, aiming, correction) or Vulgar Latin dirēctiāre, from Latin dīrectus (straight, direct, directed), from Proto-Italic *dwizrektos, perfect passive participle of dīrigō (straighten, direct), from Proto-Italic *dwizregō, from both dis- (asunder, in pieces, apart, in two), from Proto-Italic *dwis-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwís (twice, doubly, in two) + regō (I make straight, rule), from Proto-Italic *regō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃réǵeti (to straighten; right), from *h₃reǵ- (to straighten, to right oneself, just).

Noun

dress m (definite singular dressen, indefinite plural dresser, definite plural dressene)

  1. (clothing) a suit (either formal wear, or leisure or sports wear)

Etymology 2

Verb

dress

  1. imperative of dresse

References

  • “dress” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English dress (verb: kle på seg)

Noun

dress m (definite singular dressen, indefinite plural dressar, definite plural dressane)

  1. (clothing) a suit (either formal wear, or leisure or sports wear)

References

  • “dress” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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