coin vs vamp what difference

what is difference between coin and vamp

English

Etymology

From Middle English coyn, from Old French coigne (wedge, cornerstone, die for stamping), from Latin cuneus (wedge). Doublet of coign and cuneus. See also quoin (cornerstone). Displaced Middle English mynt, from Old English mynet, which was derived from Latin monēta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn
  • Homophones: coign, quoin

Noun

coin (countable and uncountable, plural coins)

  1. (money) A piece of currency, usually metallic and in the shape of a disc, but sometimes polygonal, or with a hole in the middle.
    • 1883: Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      …the coins were of all countries and sizes – doubloons, and louis d’ors, and guineas, and pieces of eight…
  2. A token used in a special establishment like a casino.
    Synonym: chip
  3. (figuratively) That which serves for payment or recompense.
    • 1654, Henry Hammond, Of Fundamentals…
      The loss of every present advantage to flesh and blood is repaid in a nobler coin.
  4. (uncountable, slang, Britain, US, African-American Vernacular) Money in general, not limited to coins.
    Synonyms: money; see also Thesaurus:money
    • 2014, Nicki Minaj, “Anaconda”, The Pinkprint:
      Boy toy named Troy, used to live in Detroit, big dope dealer money he was getting some coin.
  5. (card games) One of the suits of minor arcana in tarot, or a card of that suit.
  6. A corner or external angle.
    Synonyms: wedge, quoin
  7. A small circular slice of food.
    • 2015, Fodor’s The Carolinas & Georgia
      For munchies try deep-fried jalapeño coins, jumbo Buffalo wings, and hush puppies with a sweet edge.
    • 2020, Evan Bloom, Rachel Levin, Eat Something (page 76)
      Spread out four bread and butter pickle coins on top, and sprinkle with onion.
  8. (informal) A cryptocurrency.

Derived terms

  • coinage
  • coin of the realm
  • euro coin

Descendants

  • Japanese: コイン (koin)

Translations

Verb

coin (third-person singular simple present coins, present participle coining, simple past and past participle coined)

  1. To make of a definite fineness, and convert into coins, as a mass of metal.
    Synonyms: mint, manufacture
  2. (by extension) To make or fabricate.
    Synonyms: invent, originate
  3. To acquire rapidly, as money; to make.

Derived terms

  • coin it
  • newcoin

Translations

Anagrams

  • ICON, Nico, cion, coni, icon

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kwɛ̃/
  • Homophone: coing

Etymology 1

From Old French coin, from Latin cuneus (wedge), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ḱū (sting).

Noun

coin m (plural coins)

  1. wedge, cornerpiece
  2. corner
    • 2016, Joey Richardière, Une fille venue d’ailleurs, Chiado.
  3. area, part, place, spot
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Imitative.

Interjection

coin

  1. quack

Further reading

  • “coin” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɪnʲ/

Noun

coin

  1. inflection of :
    1. (archaic) dative singular
    2. nominative/vocative/dative plural

Mutation


Middle English

Noun

coin

  1. Alternative form of coyn (coin, quoin)

Old Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /konʲ/

Noun

coin

  1. inflection of :
    1. accusative/dative singular
    2. nominative/vocative/accusative dual
    3. nominative plural

Mutation


Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *kunes (compare Welsh cŵn, Cornish keun).

Noun

coin m pl

  1. plural of (dog)


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /væmp/
  • Rhymes: -æmp

Etymology 1

From Middle English vaumpe, vaum-pei, vampe (covering for the foot, perhaps a slipper or understocking; upper of a boot or shoe), or from Anglo-Norman vampe, *vaumpé (part of a stocking covering the top of the foot), from Old French avantpied, avantpiet, variants of avantpié, from avant (in front) + pié (foot).

Noun senses 2 and 3 (“a patch; something patched up or improvised”) appear to have been extended from sense 1 (“top part of a boot or shoe”). Sense 4 (“repeated and often improvised musical accompaniment”) was probably derived from sense 3, and sense 5 (“activity to fill or stall for time”) from sense 4.

The verb senses were derived from the noun. Compare also Middle English vaum-peien ((uncertain) to repair (footwear) with a new upper or vamp; to fabricate an upper or vamp).

Noun

vamp (plural vamps)

  1. The top part of a boot or shoe, above the sole and welt and in front of the ankle seam, that covers the instep and toes; the front part of an upper; the analogous part of a stocking. [from c. 1225]
  2. Something added to give an old thing a new appearance.
    Synonym: patch
  3. Something patched up, pieced together, improvised, or refurbished.
  4. (music) A repeated and often improvised accompaniment, usually consisting of one or two measures, often a single chord or simple chord progression, repeated as necessary, for example, to accommodate dialogue or to anticipate the entrance of a soloist. [from c. 1789]
  5. (by extension) An activity or speech intended to fill or stall for time.

Translations

Verb

vamp (third-person singular simple present vamps, present participle vamping, simple past and past participle vamped)

  1. (transitive) To patch, repair, or refurbish.
  2. (transitive) Often as vamp up: to fabricate or put together (something) from existing material, or by adding new material to something existing.
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, An Excellent New Song
      He has vamp’d an old speech, and the court to their sorrow, / Shall hear him harangue against Prior to morrow.
  3. (transitive) To cobble together, to extemporize, to improvise.
    1. (transitive, intransitive, music, specifically) To perform a vamp (a repeated, often improvised accompaniment, for example, under dialogue or while waiting for a soloist to be ready).
  4. (transitive, shoemaking) To attach a vamp (to footwear).
  5. (transitive, intransitive, now dialectal) To travel by foot; to walk.
  6. (intransitive) To delay or stall for time, as for an audience.
Derived terms
  • new-vamp, revamp
  • vamp up
  • vamper

Etymology 2

Clipping of vampire. From a character type developed first for silent film, notably for Theda Bara’s role in the 1915 film A Fool There Was.

The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun

vamp (plural vamps)

  1. A flirtatious, seductive woman, especially one who exploits men by using their sexual desire for her. [from c. 1915]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:vamp
  2. (informal) A vampire.
Derived terms
  • vampish
Translations

Verb

vamp (third-person singular simple present vamps, present participle vamping, simple past and past participle vamped)

  1. (transitive) To seduce or exploit someone.
  2. (transitive) to turn into a vampire
    • 2004, David Sosnowski, Vamped: A Novel, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN), page 277:
      If I knew what I know now before I got vamped, I’d do the same thing.
    • 2017, Keith R. A. DeCandido, Blackout, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN)
      Nobody ever got the drop on Shades, not even when he was alive, and certainly not in the fifty years since he got vamped.
    • 2012, Justine Larbalestier, Sarah Rees Brennan, Team Human, Harper Collins (→ISBN)
      Astonishing how few peasants and regular people got vamped back in the olden days, when it wasn’t regulated.
Translations

Etymology 3

Origin uncertain; possibly related to vamp (etymology 1, above): see the 2008 quotation.

Noun

vamp (plural vamps)

  1. (US, slang) A volunteer firefighter.
Translations

References

Further reading

  • vamp (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Noun

vamp f (plural vamps)

  1. vamp; femme fatale

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English vamp.

Noun

vamp f (invariable)

  1. vamp (flirtatious woman)

Spanish

Noun

vamp m or f (plural vamps)

  1. vamp

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