collect vs compile what difference

what is difference between collect and compile

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English collecten, a borrowing from Old French collecter, from Medieval Latin collectare (to collect money), from Latin collecta (a collection of money, in Late Latin a meeting, assemblage, in Medieval Latin a tax, also an assembly for prayer, a prayer), feminine of collectus, past participle of colligere, conligere (to gather together, collect, consider, conclude, infer), from com- (together) + legere (to gather).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kəˈlɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Verb

collect (third-person singular simple present collects, present participle collecting, simple past and past participle collected)

  1. (transitive) To gather together; amass.
  2. (transitive) To get; particularly, get from someone.
  3. (transitive) To accumulate (a number of similar or related objects), particularly for a hobby or recreation.
  4. (transitive, now rare) To form a conclusion; to deduce, infer. (Compare gather, get.)
    • 1690, John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book II, Chapter XVII, section 20
      [] which consequence, I conceive, is very ill collected.
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, page 292-3:
      the riot is so great that it is very difficult to collect what is being said.
  5. (intransitive, often with on or against) To collect payments.
  6. (intransitive) To come together in a group or mass.
  7. (transitive) To infer; to conclude.
    • Whence some collect that the former word imports a plurality of persons.
  8. (transitive, of a vehicle or driver) To collide with or crash into (another vehicle or obstacle).
    The truck veered across the central reservation and collected a car that was travelling in the opposite direction.

Synonyms

  • (to gather together): aggregate, gather up; see also Thesaurus:round up
  • (to get from someone): receive, secure; see also Thesaurus:receive
  • (to accumulate items for a hobby): amound, gather; see also Thesaurus:accumulate
  • (to infer, conclude, form a conclusion): assume, construe
  • (to collect payments):
  • (to come together in a group or mass): group, mass, merge; see also Thesaurus:assemble or Thesaurus:coalesce
  • (to collide with): bump into, plough into, run into
Hyponyms
  • garbage collect
Translations

Adjective

collect (not comparable)

  1. To be paid for by the recipient, as a telephone call or a shipment.
Translations

Adverb

collect (not comparable)

  1. With payment due from the recipient.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Latin ōrātiō ad collectam (prayer towards the congregation).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑlɪkt/, /ˈkɑlɛkt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒlɪkt/

Noun

collect (plural collects) (sometimes capitalized)

  1. (Christianity) The prayer said before the reading of the epistle lesson, especially one found in a prayerbook, as with the Book of Common Prayer.
Translations

Further reading

  • collect in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • collect in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • collect at OneLook Dictionary Search


English

Etymology

From Middle English compilen, from Old French compiler, from Latin compīlō (heap, plunder, verb).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kəmpʌɪl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kəmˈpaɪl/
  • Rhymes: -aɪl

Verb

compile (third-person singular simple present compiles, present participle compiling, simple past and past participle compiled)

  1. (transitive) To put together; to assemble; to make by gathering things from various sources.
  2. (obsolete) To construct, build.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.3:
      Before that Merlin dyde, he did intend / A brasen wall in compas to compyle / About Cairmardin […].
  3. (transitive, programming) To use a compiler to process source code and produce executable code.
  4. (intransitive, programming) To be successfully processed by a compiler into executable code.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To contain or comprise.
    • Which these six books compile.
  6. (obsolete) To write; to compose.
    • They are at their leisure much given to poetry; in which they compile the praises of virtuous men and actions , satires against vice

Hyponyms

Derived terms

  • compiler, compilator

Translations

Noun

compile (plural compiles)

  1. (programming) An act of compiling code.
    • 2007, Scott Meyers, Mike Lee, MAC OS X Leopard: Beyond the Manual
      Any file with an error or warning on it will be added to this smart group until the next compile.

Anagrams

  • polemic

French

Pronunciation

Verb

compile

  1. inflection of compiler:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Portuguese

Verb

compile

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of compilar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of compilar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of compilar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of compilar

Spanish

Verb

compile

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of compilar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of compilar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of compilar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of compilar.

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