colligate vs subsume what difference

what is difference between colligate and subsume

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin colligatus, past participle of colligare (to collect).

Verb

colligate (third-person singular simple present colligates, present participle colligating, simple past and past participle colligated)

  1. (transitive) To tie or bind together.
    • 1821, William Nicholson, “ISINGLASS”, in American Edition of the British Encyclopedia
      The pieces of isinglass are colligated in rows.
  2. (transitive) To formally link or connect together logically; to bring together by colligation; to sum up in a single proposition.
    • 1870, Dr. Bence Jones, Life and Letters of Faraday
      He had discovered and colligated a multitude of the most wonderful [] phenomena.

Translations

Anagrams

  • co-tillage, cotillage

Latin

Verb

colligāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of colligō

References

  • colligate in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • colligate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Etymology

From Late Latin subsumō, equivalent to the Latin sub- (sub-) and sūmō (to take), confer the English consume.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /səbˈsjuːm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /səbˈsuːm/

Verb

subsume (third-person singular simple present subsumes, present participle subsuming, simple past and past participle subsumed)

  1. To place (any one cognition) under another as belonging to it; to include or contain something else.
    • March 14, 2018, Roger Penrose writing in The Guardian, ‘Mind over matter’: Stephen Hawking – obituary
      A few years later (in a paper published by the Royal Society in 1970, by which time Hawking had become a fellow “for distinction in science” of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge), he and I joined forces to publish an even more powerful theorem which subsumed almost all the work in this area that had gone before.
    • 1961: J. A. Philip. Mimesis in the Sophistês of Plato. In: Proceedings and Transactions of the American Philological Association 92. p. 453–468.
      no allusion is made to forms because Plato is subsuming under the class of productive crafts both divine and human imitation;
  2. To consider an occurrence as part of a principle or rule; to colligate

Related terms

  • subsumption

Translations


French

Verb

subsume

  1. first-person singular present indicative of subsumer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of subsumer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of subsumer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of subsumer
  5. second-person singular imperative of subsumer

Spanish

Verb

subsume

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of subsumir.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of subsumir.
  3. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of subsumir.

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