collocate vs lump what difference

what is difference between collocate and lump

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin collocatum, supine of collocō. Doublet of couch.

Pronunciation

  • (verb)
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒləkeɪt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑləkeɪt/
  • (noun)
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒləkət/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑləkət/

Verb

collocate (third-person singular simple present collocates, present participle collocating, simple past and past participle collocated)

  1. (linguistics, translation studies) (said of certain words) To be often used together, form a collocation; for example strong collocates with tea.
  2. To arrange or occur side by side. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To set or place; to station.
    • 1548, Edward Hall, The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Families of Lancastre and Yorke
      to marſhall and collocate in order his battayles

Translations

Noun

collocate (plural collocates)

  1. (linguistics) A component word of a collocation; a word that collocates with another.

Adjective

collocate (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Set; placed.
    • of that creature you must take the parts wherein that virtue chiefly is collocate

Italian

Verb

collocate

  1. inflection of collocare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of collocato

Latin

Verb

collocāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of collocō


English

Etymology

From Middle English lumpe. Compare Dutch lomp (rag), German Low German Lump (rag), German Lumpen (rag) and Lump (ragamuffin).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lʌmp/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp

Noun

lump (plural lumps)

  1. Something that protrudes, sticks out, or sticks together; a cluster or blob; a mound or mass of no particular shape.
    Stir the gravy until there are no more lumps.
    a lump of coal; a lump of clay; a lump of cheese
  2. A swelling or nodule of tissue under the skin or in an internal part of the body.
  3. A group, set, or unit.
    The money arrived all at once as one big lump sum payment.
  4. A small, shaped mass of sugar, typically about a teaspoonful.
    Do you want one lump or two with your coffee?
  5. A dull or lazy person.
    Don’t just sit there like a lump.
  6. (informal, as plural) A beating or verbal abuse.
    He’s taken his lumps over the years.
  7. A projection beneath the breech end of a gun barrel.
  8. A kind of fish, the lumpsucker.
  9. (obsolete, slang) Food given to a tramp to be eaten on the road.
    • 1923, Arthur Preston Hankins, Cole of Spyglass Mountain, New York: Grosset & Dunlap, Chapter 12,[1]
      “A lump,” explained The Whimperer [] “is wot a kin’ lady slips youse w’en youse batter de back door. If she invites youse in and lets youse t’row yer feet unner de table, it’s a set-down. If she slips youse a lunch in a poiper bag, it’s a lump. See? []

Hyponyms

  • nubble

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

lump (third-person singular simple present lumps, present participle lumping, simple past and past participle lumped)

  1. (transitive) To treat as a single unit; to group together in a casual or chaotic manner (as if forming an ill-defined lump of the items).
  2. (transitive) To bear a heavy or awkward burden; to carry something unwieldy from one place to another.
    • 1876, Belgravia (volume 30, page 131)
      Well, a male body was brought to a certain surgeon by a man he had often employed, and the pair lumped it down on the dissecting table, and then the vendor received his money and went.
  3. (transitive, slang) To hit or strike (a person).
    • 1962, Floyd Patterson, Victory Over Myself (page 63)
      If that’s the only way you can fight, then you’d better be prepared to get lumped.

Derived terms

  • lump together

Translations

See also

  • take one’s lumps
  • lump it
  • like it or lump it

Further reading

  • lump in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • lump in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Plum, plum

Czech

Etymology

From German Lump.

Noun

lump m

  1. scoundrel, rascal

Synonyms

  • See also darebák

Related terms

  • ničemný

Further reading

  • lump in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • lump in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French

Etymology

From English lumpfish.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lœ̃p/

Noun

lump m (plural lumps)

  1. lumpfish

References

  • “lump” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Lump.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlump]
  • Hyphenation: lump
  • Rhymes: -ump

Adjective

lump (comparative lumpabb, superlative leglumpabb)

  1. rakish, dissolute, debauched (regularly engaging in late night drunken social gatherings)
    Synonyms: korhely, mulatós, kicsapongó, italos, részeges

Declension

Derived terms

  • lumpol

Noun

lump (plural lumpok)

  1. (colloquial, derogatory, chiefly of a man) rascal, carouser, roisterer, raver, drunkard (a person who regularly attends late night drunken social gatherings)

Declension

References

Further reading

  • lump in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Polish

Etymology

From German Lump.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lump/

Noun

lump m pers

  1. (colloquial, derogatory) ne’er-do-well

Declension

Noun

lump m inan

  1. (Poznań) clothing
  2. (colloquial) Clipping of lumpeks.

Further reading

  • lump in Polish dictionaries at PWN

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