coloration vs colour what difference

what is difference between coloration and colour

English

Alternative forms

  • colorification (dated)
  • colouration (British)

Etymology

From French coloration, from Latin colōrātiō.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

coloration (countable and uncountable, plural colorations)

  1. The act or art of coloring.
  2. The quality of being colored.
  3. (music) A notational device for indicating hemiola through either use of red ink (in mensural black notation) or black noteheads (in mensural white notation).
  4. (music) Ornamental division (also called passaggi, glosas, diminutions. etc.) employing rapid black notes.
  5. Political tendency.
    • 1968, Bernard Cosman, ‎Robert Jack Huckshorn, Republican Politics (page 88)
      Numerous studies of family imprint upon offspring party attachment have shown that, when the father and mother agree politically, the children are likely to adopt the political coloration of their parents.
    • 2014, Kevin P. Phillips, The Emerging Republican Majority: Updated Edition (page 175)
      The party was not organized as an Irish political vehicle, but from the first it had a decidedly Gaelic coloration.

Translations

See also

  • diatonic
  • chromatic
  • coloratura

French

Pronunciation

Noun

coloration f (plural colorations)

  1. color; coloring; coloration
    • 1827, Elisabeth Celnart, Art de la toilette
      On voit que je ne suis point au nombre des partisans de la coloration des cheveux.

      You can see that I’m not one of those people who’s partial to a coloring of the hair

Further reading

  • “coloration” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Alternative forms

  • color (American spelling)

Pronunciation

Homophone: culler

Noun

colour (countable and uncountable, plural colours) (British spelling, Canadian spelling)

  1. Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, and Britain standard spelling of color.

Adjective

colour (not comparable)

  1. Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, and Britain standard spelling of color.

Related terms

  • colourimeter

Verb

colour (third-person singular simple present colours, present participle colouring, simple past and past participle coloured)

  1. Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, and Britain standard spelling of color.

Derived terms

Anagrams

  • courol, ur-cool

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • colur, color, culur, coler, coloure, kolour

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman colur, from Latin color.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kuˈluːr/, /ˈkulur/

Noun

colour (plural colours or coloures)

  1. colour, hue, shade
  2. pigment, dye (substance for colouring)
  3. method (literary or rhetorical)
  4. justification, explanation (often feigned)

Descendants

  • English: color, colour
  • Scots: colour

References

  • “cǒlǒur, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-30.

See also


Old French

Noun

colour f (oblique plural colours, nominative singular colour, nominative plural colours)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of color

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