colour vs gloss what difference

what is difference between colour and gloss

English

Alternative forms

  • color (American spelling)

Pronunciation

Homophone: culler

Noun

colour (countable and uncountable, plural colours) (British spelling, Canadian spelling)

  1. Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, and Britain standard spelling of color.

Adjective

colour (not comparable)

  1. Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, and Britain standard spelling of color.

Related terms

  • colourimeter

Verb

colour (third-person singular simple present colours, present participle colouring, simple past and past participle coloured)

  1. Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, and Britain standard spelling of color.

Derived terms

Anagrams

  • courol, ur-cool

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • colur, color, culur, coler, coloure, kolour

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman colur, from Latin color.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kuˈluːr/, /ˈkulur/

Noun

colour (plural colours or coloures)

  1. colour, hue, shade
  2. pigment, dye (substance for colouring)
  3. method (literary or rhetorical)
  4. justification, explanation (often feigned)

Descendants

  • English: color, colour
  • Scots: colour

References

  • “cǒlǒur, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-30.

See also


Old French

Noun

colour f (oblique plural colours, nominative singular colour, nominative plural colours)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of color


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡlɒs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡlɔs/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /ɡlɑs/
  • Rhymes: -ɒs, -ɔːs

Etymology 1

Probably from a North Germanic language, compare Icelandic glossi (spark, flame), glossa (to flame); or perhaps from dialectal Dutch gloos (a glow, flare), related to West Frisian gloeze (a glow), Middle Low German glȫsen (to smoulder, glow), German glosen (to smoulder); ultimately from Proto-Germanic *glus- (to glow, shine), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰel- (to flourish; be green or yellow). More at glow.

Noun

gloss (usually uncountable, plural glosses)

  1. A surface shine or luster.
    Synonyms: brilliance, gleam, luster, sheen, shine
  2. (figuratively) A superficially or deceptively attractive appearance.
    Synonyms: façade, front, veneer.
    • 1770, Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village
      To me more dear, congenial to my heart, / One native charm than all the gloss of art.
Derived terms
  • glossy
  • glost
Related terms
  • glow
Translations

Verb

gloss (third-person singular simple present glosses, present participle glossing, simple past and past participle glossed)

  1. (transitive) To give a gloss or sheen to.
    Synonyms: polish, shine
  2. (transitive) To make (something) attractive by deception
    • 1722, Ambrose Philips, The Briton
      You have the art to gloss the foulest cause.
  3. (intransitive) To become shiny.
  4. (transitive, idiomatic) Used in a phrasal verb: gloss over (to cover up a mistake or crime, to treat something with less care than it deserves).
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English glosse, glose, from Late Latin glōssa (obsolete or foreign word requiring explanation), from Ancient Greek γλῶσσα (glôssa, language).

Noun

gloss (plural glosses)

  1. (countable) A brief explanatory note or translation of a foreign, archaic, technical, difficult, complex, or uncommon expression, inserted after the original, in the margin of a document, or between lines of a text.
    Synonyms: explanation, note, marginalia
    • 1684, Samuel Butler, Hudibras
      All this, without a gloss or comment, / He would unriddle in a moment.
  2. (countable) A glossary; a collection of such notes.
    Synonyms: glossary, lexicon
  3. (countable, obsolete) An expression requiring such explanatory treatment.
  4. (countable) An extensive commentary on some text.
    Synonyms: commentary, discourse, discussion
  5. (countable, law, US) An interpretation by a court of specific point within a statute or case law.
    • 1979 American Bar Foundation. Annotated code of professional responsibility. page ix
      This volume is thus not a narrowly defined treatment of the Code of Professional Responsibility but rather represents a “common law” gloss on it.
    • 2007 Bruce R. Hopkins. The law of tax-exempt organizations. page 76
      Judicial Gloss on Test [section title]
Derived terms
  • beglossed
Related terms
  • glossary
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English glossen, glosen, from Old French gloser and Medieval Latin glossāre.

Verb

gloss (third-person singular simple present glosses, present participle glossing, simple past and past participle glossed)

  1. (transitive) To add a gloss to (a text).
    Synonyms: annotate, mark up
Derived terms
  • gloss over
Translations

Further reading

  • gloss (material appearance) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gloss (annotation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gloss in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • gloss in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • gloss at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • slogs

Portuguese

Noun

gloss m (uncountable)

  1. lip gloss (cosmetic product)

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