commemorate vs record what difference

what is difference between commemorate and record

English

Etymology

From Latin commemorare, from com- + memorare (to remind of); see memory.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kəˈmɛməˌɹeɪt/

Verb

commemorate (third-person singular simple present commemorates, present participle commemorating, simple past and past participle commemorated)

  1. (transitive) To honour the memory of someone or something with a ceremony or object.
    • 2009, Naava Piatka, No Goodbyes: A Father-Daughter Memoir of Love, War and Resurrection, page 98:
      On the anniversary of Korczak’s murder, Israel commemorated him with a special postal issue. As a stamp collector and philatelic columnist, it pleased me greatly when other countries followed Israel’s example in honoring him.
  2. (transitive) To serve as a memorial to someone or something.

Synonyms

  • memorialize

Derived terms

  • commemorative
  • commemoration
  • decommemorate

Translations


Italian

Verb

commemorate

  1. inflection of commemorare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of commemorato

Latin

Verb

commemorāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of commemorō


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English, borrowed from Old French record, from recorder. See record (verb).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛkɔːd/
  • (General American) enPR: rĕkʹərd, IPA(key): /ˈɹɛkɚd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkɔː(ɹ)d, -ɛkə(ɹ)d
  • Hyphenation: rec‧ord

Noun

record (plural records)

  1. An item of information put into a temporary or permanent physical medium.
  2. Any instance of a physical medium on which information was put for the purpose of preserving it and making it available for future reference.
    Synonym: log
  3. Ellipsis of phonograph record: a disc, usually made from vinyl, on which sound is recorded and may be replayed on a phonograph.
    Synonyms: disc, phonograph record, vinyl
  4. (computing) A set of data relating to a single individual or item.
    Pull up the record on John Smith. What’s his medical history?
  5. (programming) A data structure similar to a struct, in some programming languages such as C# and Java based on classes and designed for storing immutable data.
    Coordinate terms: struct, enumeration
  6. The most extreme known value of some variable, particularly that of an achievement in competitive events.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • record book
  • record-breaking
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English recorden (to repeat, to report), borrowed from Old French recorder (to get by heart), from Latin recordārī, present active infinitive of recordor (remember, call to mind), from re- (back, again) + cor (heart; mind).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹɨˈkɔːd/
  • (General American) enPR: rĭ-kôrdʹ, rē-kôrdʹ, IPA(key): /ɹɪˈkɔɹd/, /ɹiˈkɔɹd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)d
  • Hyphenation: re‧cord

Verb

record (third-person singular simple present records, present participle recording, simple past and past participle recorded)

  1. (transitive) To make a record of information.
    I wanted to record every detail of what happened, for the benefit of future generations.
  2. (transitive) To make an audio or video recording of.
    Within a week they had recorded both the song and the video for it.
  3. (transitive, law) To give legal status to by making an official public record.
    When the deed was recorded, we officially owned the house.
  4. (intransitive) To fix in a medium, usually in a tangible medium.
  5. (intransitive) To make an audio, video, or multimedia recording.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To repeat; to practice.
  7. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To sing or repeat a tune.
    • 1595, George Peele, The Old Wives’ Tale, The Malone Society Reprints, 1908, lines 741-742,[4]
      Come Berecynthia, let vs in likewise,
      And heare the Nightingale record hir notes.
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax (translator), Godfrey of Bulloigne, or The Recouerie of Ierusalem by Torquato Tasso, London: I. Iaggard and M. Lownes, Book 2, p. 39,[5]
      They long’d to see the day, to heare the larke
      Record her hymnes and chant her carols blest,
    • c. 1608, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Act IV, Prologue,[6]
      [] to the lute
      She sung, and made the night-bird mute,
      That still records with moan;
    • 1616, William Browne, Britannia’s Pastorals, London: John Haviland, 1625, Book 2, Song 4, p. 129,[7]
      [] the Nymph did earnestly contest
      Whether the Birds or she recorded best []
  8. (obsolete) To reflect; to ponder.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church-History of Britain from the Birth of Jesus Christ until the Year M.DC.XLVIII, London: John Williams, Book 5, Section 3, page 204,[8]
      [] he was [] carried to the Scaffold on the Tower-hill [] , himself praying all the way, and recording upon the words which he before had read.
Derived terms

Antonyms

  • (make a record of information): erase
  • (make an audio or video recording of): erase
Translations

Anagrams

  • Corder

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔɾt

Noun

record m (plural records)

  1. memory, recollection of events
  2. souvenir

See also

  • rècord

Dutch

Etymology 1

Borrowed either from French record, which is pronounced similarly, or otherwise from English record; the French term has also been borrowed from English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rəˈkoːr/
  • Hyphenation: re‧cord

Noun

record n (plural records, diminutive recordje n)

  1. A record, a best achievement.
Derived terms
  • baanrecord
  • recordhouder
  • wereldrecord
Descendants
  • Indonesian: rekor
  • Papiamentu: rekòr

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English record.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛ.kɔrt/
  • Hyphenation: re‧cord

Noun

record m or n (plural records, diminutive recordje n)

  1. A record, something recorded on an electronic storage medium.
  2. A data point in a database.
  3. A vinyl record.

French

Etymology

From English record.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁə.kɔʁ/

Noun

record m (plural records)

  1. record (most extreme known value of some achievement)
    Le record du saut en hauteur a été battu par Javier Sotomayor en 1993.

Further reading

  • “record” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • corder

Italian

Etymology

From English record.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛ.kord/

Noun

record m (invariable)

  1. record (sporting achievement; computer data element)

Further reading

  • record in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese

Noun

record m (plural records)

  1. Alternative form of recorde

Adjective

record (invariable, comparable)

  1. Alternative form of recorde

Romanian

Etymology

From French record.

Noun

record n (plural recorduri)

  1. record (achievement)

Declension


Spanish

Noun

record m (plural records)

  1. Misspelling of récord.
  2. record

Welsh

Etymology

From English record.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛkɔrd/

Noun

record f (plural recordiau, not mutable)

  1. record

Derived terms

  • record byd (world record)
  • recordio (to record)
  • recordiad (recording)

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “record”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

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