commend vs praise what difference

what is difference between commend and praise

English

Etymology

From Middle English commenden, from Old French comender, from Latin commendō (commend, entrust to, commit, recommend), from com- + mandare (to commit, intrust, enjoin), from manus (hand) + dare (to put). Doublet of command.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kəˈmɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Verb

commend (third-person singular simple present commends, present participle commending, simple past and past participle commended)

  1. (transitive) To congratulate or reward.
  2. (transitive) To praise or acclaim.
    • Segrais on this Subject of a Heroe’s ſhedding Tears, obſerves that Hiſtorians commend Alexander for weeping, when he read the mighty Actions of Achilles.
  3. (transitive) To entrust or commit to the care of someone else.
    • Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit.
  4. (transitive) To mention by way of courtesy, implying remembrance and goodwill.
  5. (transitive) To recommend.
    • 1677, Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature
      Among the objects of knowledge, two especially [] commend themselves to our contemplation.
    • I commend vnto you Phebe our sister, which is a seruant of the Church which is at Cenchrea:
  6. (transitive, dated) To adorn; to set off.

Related terms

  • commendable
  • commendation
  • commendatory
  • recommend

Translations

See also

  • suggest
  • consider
  • approval

Noun

commend (plural commends)

  1. (obsolete) Commendation; praise.
  2. (obsolete, in the plural) Compliments; greetings.
    • Hearty commends and much endeared love unto you.

Further reading

  • commend in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • commend in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • commend at OneLook Dictionary Search


English

Etymology

From Middle English praisen, preisen, borrowed from Old French proisier, preisier (to value, prize), from Late Latin pretiō (to value, prize) from pretium (price, worth, reward). See prize. Displaced native Middle English lofen, loven (to praise) (from Old English lofian, compare Middle English and Old English lof (praise), see love, lofe, loff), Middle English herien (to praise, glorify, celebrate) (from Old English herian), Middle English rosen (to praise, glorify) (from Old Norse hrósa).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: prāz, IPA(key): /pɹeɪz/
  • Rhymes: -eɪz
  • Homophones: prays, preys

Noun

praise (countable and uncountable, plural praises)

  1. commendation; favourable representation in words
  2. worship

Synonyms

  • See Thesaurus:praise

Antonyms

  • blame
  • criticize
  • See Thesaurus:praise

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

praise (third-person singular simple present praises, present participle praising, simple past and past participle praised)

  1. To give praise to; to commend, glorify, or worship.

Antonyms

  • blame

Derived terms

  • overpraise
  • underpraise
  • unpraised

Translations

Further reading

  • praise in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • praise in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Arispe, Parise, Pearis, Persia, aspire, paires, paries, spirea

Scottish Gaelic

Noun

praise f

  1. genitive singular of prais

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