commove vs disturb what difference

what is difference between commove and disturb

English

Etymology

From Middle English commoeven, from Old French commovoir.

Verb

commove (third-person singular simple present commoves, present participle commoving, simple past and past participle commoved)

  1. (dated, transitive) To move violently; to agitate, excite or rouse
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      Hereupon Mr. Worldly Wiseman was much commoved with passion, and shaking his cane with a very threatful countenance, broke forth upon this wise: “Learning, quotha!” said he; “I would have all such rogues scourged by the Hangman!”

Related terms

  • commotion

Latin

Verb

commovē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of commoveō


English

Etymology

From Middle English destourben, from Anglo-Norman distourber and Old French destorber, from Latin disturbare, intensifying for turbare (to throw into disorder), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twerH-, *(s)turH- (to rotate, swirl, twirl, move around).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪsˈtɜːb/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)b

Verb

disturb (third-person singular simple present disturbs, present participle disturbing, simple past and past participle disturbed)

  1. (transitive) to confuse a quiet, constant state or a calm, continuous flow, in particular: thoughts, actions or liquids.
  2. (transitive) to divert, redirect, or alter by disturbing.
  3. (intransitive) to have a negative emotional impact; to cause emotional distress or confusion.

Derived terms

  • disturbance

Translations

Noun

disturb

  1. (obsolete) disturbance

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