companionship vs society what difference

what is difference between companionship and society

English

Etymology

From companion +‎ -ship

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kəmˈpænjənʃɪp/
  • Hyphenation: com‧pan‧ion‧ship

Noun

companionship (countable and uncountable, plural companionships)

  1. The state of having or being a companion.
  2. (archaic) An association, a fellowship.
    a companionship of printers
  3. The state of being a journeyman.
  4. An organized group of people.

Translations

References

  • companionship in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.


English

Alternative forms

  • soc. (abbreviation)

Etymology

1530s; borrowed from Middle French societé, from Old French societé, from Latin societās, societātem (fellowship, association, alliance, union, community), from socius (associated, allied; partner, companion, ally), from Proto-Indo-European *sokʷ-yo- (companion), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to follow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /səˈsaɪ.ə.ti/

Noun

society (countable and uncountable, plural societies)

  1. (countable) A long-standing group of people sharing cultural aspects such as language, dress, norms of behavior and artistic forms.
  2. (countable) A group of people who meet from time to time to engage in a common interest; an association or organization.
    • At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. [] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
  3. (countable) The sum total of all voluntary interrelations between individuals.
  4. (uncountable) The people of one’s country or community taken as a whole.
  5. (uncountable) High society.
  6. (countable, law) A number of people joined by mutual consent to deliberate, determine and act toward a common goal.

Derived terms

Translations

References

Further reading

  • “society” in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 291.

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