compensate vs pay what difference

what is difference between compensate and pay

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin compensatus, past participle of compensare (to weight together one thing against another, balance, make good, later also shorten, spare), from com- (together) + pensare (to weight).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒm.pən.seɪt/, /ˈkɒm.pɛn.seɪt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑm.pənˌseɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb

compensate (third-person singular simple present compensates, present participle compensating, simple past and past participle compensated)

  1. To do (something good) after (something bad) happens
  2. To pay or reward someone in exchange for work done or some other consideration.
    It is hard work, but they will compensate you well for it.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To make up for; to do something in place of something else; to correct, satisfy; to reach an agreement such that the scales are literally or (metaphorically) balanced; to equalize or make even.
    His loud voice cannot compensate for a lack of personality.
    To compensate me for his tree landing on my shed, my neighbor paved my driveway.
    • , Preface
      The pleasures of life do not compensate the miseries.
  4. To adjust or adapt to a change, often a harm or deprivation.
    I don’t like driving that old car because it always steers a little to the left so I’m forever compensating for that when I drive it. Trust me, it gets annoying real fast.
    To compensate for his broken leg, Gary uses crutches.

Synonyms

  • (to do something good): See Thesaurus:compensate
  • (to pay): guerdon, reimburse; see also Thesaurus:reimburse
  • (to adjust to a change): acclimatize, acclimate, accommodate, accustom, adapt; see also Thesaurus:accustom
  • (to make up for): See Thesaurus:atone or Thesaurus:offset

Derived terms

  • recompensate

Related terms

  • compensation
  • compensatory
  • compensable
  • compensably
  • recompense

Translations

Further reading

  • compensate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • compensate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Italian

Verb

compensate

  1. inflection of compensare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of compensato

Latin

Verb

compēnsāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of compēnsō


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /peɪ/, [pʰeɪ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Etymology 1

From Middle English payen, from Old French paiier (pay), from Medieval Latin pācāre (to settle, satisfy) from Latin pācāre (to pacify). Displaced native Middle English yelden, yielden (to pay) (from Old English ġieldan (to pay)) and Middle English schotten (to pay, make payment) (from Old English sċot, ġesċot (payment)).

Verb

pay (third-person singular simple present pays, present participle paying, simple past and past participle paid or (obsolete) payed)

  1. (transitive) To give money or other compensation to in exchange for goods or services.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To discharge, as a debt or other obligation, by giving or doing what is due or required.
    • The wicked borroweth, and payeth not again.
  3. (transitive) To be profitable for.
  4. (transitive) To give (something else than money).
  5. (intransitive) To be profitable or worth the effort.
  6. (intransitive) To discharge an obligation or debt.
  7. (intransitive) To suffer consequences.
  8. (transitive) To admit that a joke, punchline, etc., was funny.
Conjugation
Hypernyms
  • (to give money): compensate
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: paysa
  • Scottish Gaelic: pàigh
Translations

Noun

pay (countable and uncountable, plural pays)

  1. Money given in return for work; salary or wages.
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

pay (not comparable)

  1. Operable or accessible on deposit of coins.
  2. Pertaining to or requiring payment.
Translations

Etymology 2

Old French peier, from Latin picare (to pitch).

Verb

pay (third-person singular simple present pays, present participle paying, simple past and past participle payed)

  1. (nautical, transitive) To cover (the bottom of a vessel, a seam, a spar, etc.) with tar or pitch, or a waterproof composition of tallow, resin, etc.; to smear.
Translations

Further reading

  • pay in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • pay in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • pay at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • APY, Yap, pya, yap

Anguthimri

Noun

pay

  1. (Mpakwithi) forehead
  2. (Mpakwithi) face

References

  • Terry Crowley, The Mpakwithi dialect of Anguthimri (1981), page 187

Azerbaijani

Etymology

According to Nişanyan, from Persian پای(pây, foot), with the sense ”share” originating from the Persian expression borrowed into Old Anatolian Turkish بای برابر(pây-berâber, equally, to the same proportion, literally equal foot). The word is present in its modern sense in XIVth century Book of Dede Korkut.

The non-Oghuz Turkic cognates, such as Kirgiz and Yakut пай (pay, share) are, according to Nişanyan, a borrowing from the Ottoman Turkish پای‎, via Russian пай (paj).

Noun

pay (definite accusative payı, plural paylar)

  1. share
  2. portion

Declension

Derived terms

  • paylamaq (to distribute)
  • paylaşmaq (to divide among one-selves)

References

  • Nişanyan, Sevan (2002–), “pay”, in Nişanyan Sözlük

Cebuano

Etymology

From English pi, Ancient Greek πεῖ (peî).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: pay

Noun

pay

  1. the name of the sixteenth letter of the Classical and Modern Greek alphabets and the seventeenth in Old Greek
  2. (mathematics) an irrational and transcendental constant representing the ratio of the circumference of a Euclidean circle to its diameter; approximately 3.14159265358979323846264338327950; usually written π

Jakaltek

Etymology

From Proto-Mayan *pahar.

Noun

pay

  1. skunk

References

  • Church, Clarence; Church, Katherine (1955) Vocabulario castellano-jacalteco, jacalteco-castellano[2] (in Spanish), Guatemala C. A.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 65; 39

Kalasha

Noun

pay

  1. A goat

Limos Kalinga

Adverb

pay

  1. too

Northern Kurdish

Etymology

From Turkish pay.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɑːj/

Noun

pay ?

  1. share

Old Portuguese

Etymology

From padre, from Latin patrem, accusative singular of pater (father), from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpaj/

Noun

pay m

  1. (hypocoristic, usually childish) papa, dad, father
    • 1525-1526, Cancioneiro da Biblioteca Nacional, João de Gaia, B 1433: Vosso pai na rua (facsimile)
      Vosso pay na Rua / anta porta sua

      Your dad [is] on the street / before his door

Synonyms

  • padre

Coordinate terms

  • mãy, madre

Descendants

  • Galician: pai
  • Portuguese: pai
    • Guinea-Bissau Creole: pai
    • Indo-Portuguese: pai
    • Kabuverdianu: pai
    • Kristang: pai
    • Sãotomense: pe
      • Annobonese: pe

Portuguese

Noun

pay m (plural pays)

  1. Obsolete spelling of pai
    • 1545, Garcia de Resende, Liuro das obras de Garcia de Reſẽnde que trata da vida [] do christianiſſimo; muito alto ⁊ muyto poderoſo principe el Rey dõ João o ſegundo deſte nome, page 1:
      De ſeu pay ⁊ ſua mãy ⁊ ſeu nacimento.

      About his father and his mother and his birth.

Quechua

Pronoun

pay

  1. he, she, it

See also


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English pie.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpai/, [ˈpai̯]
  • Rhymes: -aj

Noun

pay m (plural pays)

  1. (Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru) pie (food)

Derived terms

  • pay de queso (cheesecake) (Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Guatemala)
  • pay de coco (coconut cream pie)
  • pay de leche condensada (condensed milk cake)

Turkish

Etymology

From Proto-Turkic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [paj]
  • Hyphenation: pay

Noun

pay (definite accusative payı, plural paylar)

  1. portion
  2. (arithmetic) numerator

Declension

Synonyms

  • hak

Antonyms

  • payda

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