compile vs compose what difference

what is difference between compile and compose

English

Etymology

From Middle English compilen, from Old French compiler, from Latin compīlō (heap, plunder, verb).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kəmpʌɪl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kəmˈpaɪl/
  • Rhymes: -aɪl

Verb

compile (third-person singular simple present compiles, present participle compiling, simple past and past participle compiled)

  1. (transitive) To put together; to assemble; to make by gathering things from various sources.
  2. (obsolete) To construct, build.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.3:
      Before that Merlin dyde, he did intend / A brasen wall in compas to compyle / About Cairmardin […].
  3. (transitive, programming) To use a compiler to process source code and produce executable code.
  4. (intransitive, programming) To be successfully processed by a compiler into executable code.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To contain or comprise.
    • Which these six books compile.
  6. (obsolete) To write; to compose.
    • They are at their leisure much given to poetry; in which they compile the praises of virtuous men and actions , satires against vice

Hyponyms

Derived terms

  • compiler, compilator

Translations

Noun

compile (plural compiles)

  1. (programming) An act of compiling code.
    • 2007, Scott Meyers, Mike Lee, MAC OS X Leopard: Beyond the Manual
      Any file with an error or warning on it will be added to this smart group until the next compile.

Anagrams

  • polemic

French

Pronunciation

Verb

compile

  1. inflection of compiler:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Portuguese

Verb

compile

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of compilar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of compilar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of compilar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of compilar

Spanish

Verb

compile

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of compilar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of compilar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of compilar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of compilar.


English

Etymology

From Middle English composen, from Old French composer (to compose, compound, adjust, settle), from com- + poser, as an adaptation of Latin componere (to put together, compose), from com- (together) + ponere (to put, place)

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: kəm-pōzʹ, IPA(key): /kəmˈpoʊz/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: kəm-pōzʹ, IPA(key): /kəmˈpəʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Verb

compose (third-person singular simple present composes, present participle composing, simple past and past participle composed)

  1. (transitive) To make something by merging parts. [from later 15th c.]
    • December 22 1678, Thomas Sprat, A Sermon Preached before the King at White-Hall
      Zeal ought to be composed of the highest degrees of all pious affection.
  2. (transitive) To make up the whole; to constitute.
    • A few useful things [] compose their intellectual possessions.
  3. (transitive, nonstandard) To comprise.
  4. (transitive or intransitive) To construct by mental labor; to think up; particularly, to produce or create a literary or musical work.
    • 1714, Alexander Pope, Imitation of Horace, Book II. Sat. 6
      Let me [] compose / Something in Verse as true as Prose.
    • 1838, Benjamin Haydon, Painting, and the fine arts
      the genius that composed such works as the “Standard” and “Last Supper”
  5. (sometimes reflexive) To calm; to free from agitation.
    • Compose thy mind; / Nor frauds are here contrived, nor force designed.
  6. To arrange the elements of a photograph or other picture.
  7. To settle (an argument, dispute etc.); to come to a settlement.
    • 2010, Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22, Atlantic 2011, p. 280:
      By trying his best to compose matters with the mullahs, he had sincerely shown that he did not seek a violent collision []
  8. To arrange in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition.
    • In a peaceful grave my corpse compose.
  9. (printing, dated) To arrange (types) in a composing stick for printing; to typeset.

Synonyms

  • (make up the whole): constitute, form; see also Thesaurus:compose

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


French

Verb

compose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of composer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of composer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of composer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of composer
  5. second-person singular imperative of composer

Italian

Verb

compose

  1. third-person singular past historic of comporre

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