complicate vs perplex what difference

what is difference between complicate and perplex

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin complicatus, past participle of complicare (to fold together), from com- (together) + plicare (to fold, weave, knit); see plaid, and compare complex.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑmplɪkeɪt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmplɪkeɪt/
  • Hyphenation: com‧pli‧cate

Verb

complicate (third-person singular simple present complicates, present participle complicating, simple past and past participle complicated)

  1. (transitive) To make complex; to modify so as to make something intricate or difficult.
    • 1896, Arthur Edward Waite, Devil-Worship in France, or the Question of Lucifer Chapter 14
      Let us, however, put aside for the moment the mendacities and forgeries which complicate the question of Lucifer, and let us approach Palladism from an altogether different side.
  2. (transitive) To involve in a convoluted matter.
    Don’t complicate yourself in issues that are beyond the scope of your understanding.
    John has been complicated in the affair by new tapes that surfaced.
    The DA has made every effort to complicate me in the scandal.

Synonyms

  • (involve in a convoluted matter): intricate, entangle, embroil, mix up (in something), mire

Related terms

  • complication
  • explicate

Translations

See also

  • complex

Adjective

complicate (comparative more complicate, superlative most complicate)

  1. (obsolete) Intertwined.
  2. (now rare, poetic) Complex, complicated.
    • 1745, Edward Young, Night-Thoughts, I:
      How poor, how rich, how abject, how august, / How complicate, how wonderful, is Man!

Further reading

  • complicate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • complicate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Italian

Adjective

complicate

  1. feminine plural of complicato

Verb

complicate

  1. inflection of complicare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of complicato

Latin

Verb

complicāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of complicō


English

Etymology

From Old French, from Latin perplexus (entangled, confused), from per (through) + plexus, perfect passive participle of plectō (plait, weave, braid).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: pərplĕksʹ, IPA(key): /pɚˈplɛks/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: pəplĕksʹ, IPA(key): /pəˈplɛks/
  • Rhymes: -ɛks

Verb

perplex (third-person singular simple present perplexes, present participle perplexing, simple past and past participle perplexed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to feel baffled; to puzzle.
  2. (transitive) To involve; to entangle; to make intricate or complicated.
    • What was thought obscure, perplexed, and too hard for our weak parts, will lie open to the understanding in a fair view.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To plague; to vex; to torment.
    • 1726, George Granville, Chloe
      Chloe’s the wonder of her sex, ‘Tis well her heart is tender, How might such killing eyes perplex, With virtue to defend her.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:confuse

Related terms

  • perplexable
  • perplexation
  • perplexed
  • perplexedness
  • perplexing
  • perplexity
  • perplexment

Translations

Adjective

perplex (comparative more perplex, superlative most perplex)

  1. (obsolete) intricate; difficult
    • 1665, Joseph Glanvill, Scepsis Scientifica
      How the soul directs the spirits for the motion of the body, according to the several animal exigents, is as perplex in the Theory, as either of the former.

Noun

perplex (plural perplexes)

  1. (obsolete) A difficulty.

Further reading

  • perplex in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • perplex in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • perplex at OneLook Dictionary Search

German

Etymology

From French perplexe, from Latin perplexus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛʁˈplɛks/
  • Hyphenation: per‧plex

Adjective

perplex (comparative perplexer, superlative am perplexesten)

  1. (colloquial, rarely attributive) confused, perplexed, puzzled
    Synonyms: verdutzt, verblüfft, verwirrt

Declension

Related terms

  • Perplexität

Further reading

  • “perplex” in Duden online
  • “perplex” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • “perplex” in Deutsches Wörterbuch von Jacob und Wilhelm Grimm, 16 vols., Leipzig 1854–1961.

Romanian

Etymology

From French perplexe, from Latin perplex.

Adjective

perplex m or n (feminine singular perplexă, masculine plural perplecși, feminine and neuter plural perplexe)

  1. perplexed

Declension


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