comply vs follow what difference

what is difference between comply and follow

English

Etymology

From Italian complire, Catalan complir (to complete, fulfil; to carry out), Spanish cumplir (to complete, fulfil), from Latin complēre, from compleō (to finish, complete; to fulfil), from com- (prefix indicating completeness of an act) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (beside, near; by, with)) + pleō (to fill; to fulfil) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₁- (to fill)).
More likely from Old French compli, past participle of complir “to accomplish, fulfill, carry out,” from Vulgar Latin *complire, from Latin complere “to fill up,” transferred to “fulfill, finish (a task),” from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere “to fill” (from PIE root *pele- (1) “to fill”)https://www.etymonline.com/word/comply. The word is very close to the French verb “complaire” which means to satisfy or to please. The word is also cognate with Old French complir (to accomplish, complete; to do) (modern French accomplir (to accomplish, achieve)). Compare complete, compliment.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /kəmˈplaɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Hyphenation: com‧ply

Verb

comply (third-person singular simple present complies, present participle complying, simple past and past participle complied)

  1. To yield assent; to accord; to acquiesce, agree, consent; to adapt oneself, to conform.
    Synonyms: give way; see also Thesaurus:accede
    Antonym: violate
    • 1663, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of being Religious
      That the generality of the Philoſophers and wiſe men of all Nations and Ages, did diſſent from the multitude in theſe things. They believed but one Supreme Deity, which with reſpect to the various benefits men received from him, had ſeveral titles beſtowed upon him. And although they did ſervilely comply with the people in worſhipping God by ſenſible images and repreſentations, yet it appears by their writings that they deſpiſed this way of worſhip as ſuperſtitous and unſuitable to the nature of God.
  2. (archaic) To accomplish, to fulfil. [from late 16th c.]
    Synonyms: carry out, consummate
  3. (archaic) To be ceremoniously courteous; to make one’s compliments.
  4. (archaic) To enfold; to embrace.

Usage notes

The word is usually followed by with.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • accomplish
  • complete
  • compliment

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • clompy


English

Etymology

From Middle English folwen, folȝen, folgen, from Old English folgian (to follow, pursue), from Proto-West Germanic *folgēn, from Proto-Germanic *fulgāną (to follow).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɒləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɑloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒləʊ
  • Hyphenation: fol‧low

Verb

follow (third-person singular simple present follows, present participle following, simple past and past participle followed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To go after; to pursue; to move behind in the same path or direction.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To go or come after in a sequence.
    We both ordered the soup, with roast beef to follow.
  3. (transitive) To carry out (orders, instructions, etc.).
  4. (transitive) To live one’s life according to (religion, teachings, etc).
  5. (transitive) To understand, to pay attention to.
  6. (transitive) To watch, to keep track of (reports of) some event or person.
  7. (Internet, transitive) To subscribe to see content from an account on a social media platform.
  8. (transitive, intransitive) To be a logical consequence of something.
  9. (transitive) To walk in, as a road or course; to attend upon closely, as a profession or calling.

Synonyms

  • (go after in a physical space): trail, tail
  • (in a sequence): succeed; see also Thesaurus:succeed
  • (carry out): pursue
  • (be a consequence): ensue

Antonyms

  • (go after in a physical space): guide, lead
  • (go after in a sequence): precede; see also Thesaurus:precede
  • unfollow

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • chase (verb)

Noun

follow (plural follows)

  1. (sometimes attributive) In billiards and similar games, a stroke causing a ball to follow another ball after hitting it.
    a follow shot
  2. (Internet) The act of following another user’s online activity.
    • 2012, Brett Petersel, ‎Esther Schindler, The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Twitter Marketing
      It doesn’t take too many follows to become overwhelmed with the deluge of content on Twitter.

Anagrams

  • Wollof

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