compose vs frame what difference

what is difference between compose and frame

English

Etymology

From Middle English composen, from Old French composer (to compose, compound, adjust, settle), from com- + poser, as an adaptation of Latin componere (to put together, compose), from com- (together) + ponere (to put, place)

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: kəm-pōzʹ, IPA(key): /kəmˈpoʊz/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: kəm-pōzʹ, IPA(key): /kəmˈpəʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Verb

compose (third-person singular simple present composes, present participle composing, simple past and past participle composed)

  1. (transitive) To make something by merging parts. [from later 15th c.]
    • December 22 1678, Thomas Sprat, A Sermon Preached before the King at White-Hall
      Zeal ought to be composed of the highest degrees of all pious affection.
  2. (transitive) To make up the whole; to constitute.
    • A few useful things [] compose their intellectual possessions.
  3. (transitive, nonstandard) To comprise.
  4. (transitive or intransitive) To construct by mental labor; to think up; particularly, to produce or create a literary or musical work.
    • 1714, Alexander Pope, Imitation of Horace, Book II. Sat. 6
      Let me [] compose / Something in Verse as true as Prose.
    • 1838, Benjamin Haydon, Painting, and the fine arts
      the genius that composed such works as the “Standard” and “Last Supper”
  5. (sometimes reflexive) To calm; to free from agitation.
    • Compose thy mind; / Nor frauds are here contrived, nor force designed.
  6. To arrange the elements of a photograph or other picture.
  7. To settle (an argument, dispute etc.); to come to a settlement.
    • 2010, Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22, Atlantic 2011, p. 280:
      By trying his best to compose matters with the mullahs, he had sincerely shown that he did not seek a violent collision []
  8. To arrange in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition.
    • In a peaceful grave my corpse compose.
  9. (printing, dated) To arrange (types) in a composing stick for printing; to typeset.

Synonyms

  • (make up the whole): constitute, form; see also Thesaurus:compose

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


French

Verb

compose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of composer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of composer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of composer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of composer
  5. second-person singular imperative of composer

Italian

Verb

compose

  1. third-person singular past historic of comporre


English

Etymology

From Middle English framen, fremen, fremmen (to construct, build, strengthen, refresh, perform, execute, profit, avail), from Old English framian, fremian, fremman (to profit, avail, advance, perform, promote, execute, commit, do), from Proto-Germanic *framjaną (to perform, promote), from Proto-Indo-European *promo- (front, forward). Cognate with Low German framen (to commit, effect), Danish fremme (to promote, further, perform), Swedish främja (to promote, encourage, foster), Icelandic fremja (to commit). More at from.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɹeɪm/
  • Rhymes: -eɪm

Verb

frame (third-person singular simple present frames, present participle framing, simple past and past participle framed)

  1. (transitive) To fit, as for a specific end or purpose; make suitable or comfortable; adapt; adjust.
    • 1578, John Lyly, Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit
    • 1828, Walter Savage Landor, Imaginary Conversations – Lord Brooke and Sir Philip Sidney
    • 1832, Isaac Taylor, Saturday Evening
  2. (transitive) To construct by fitting or uniting together various parts; fabricate by union of constituent parts.
  3. (transitive) To bring or put into form or order; adjust the parts or elements of; compose; contrive; plan; devise.
    • He began to frame the loveliest countenance he could.
  4. (transitive) Of a constructed object such as a building, to put together the structural elements.
  5. (transitive) Of a picture such as a painting or photograph, to place inside a decorative border.
  6. (transitive) To position visually within a fixed boundary.
  7. (transitive) To construct in words so as to establish a context for understanding or interpretation.
  8. (transitive, criminology) Conspire to incriminate falsely a presumably innocent person. See frameup.
  9. (intransitive, dialectal, mining) To wash ore with the aid of a frame.
  10. (intransitive, dialectal) To move.
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To proceed; to go.
  12. (tennis) To hit (the ball) with the frame of the racquet rather than the strings (normally a mishit).
  13. (transitive, obsolete) To strengthen; refresh; support.
  14. (transitive, obsolete) To execute; perform.
  15. (transitive, obsolete) To cause; to bring about; to produce.
  16. (intransitive, obsolete) To profit; avail.
  17. (intransitive, obsolete) To fit; accord.
    • 1531, William Tyndale, An Answer unto Sir Thomas More’s Dialogue
  18. (intransitive, obsolete) To succeed in doing or trying to do something; manage.

Synonyms

  • (conspire to incriminate): fit up

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Dutch: frame
  • German: framen

Translations

Noun

frame (plural frames)

  1. The structural elements of a building or other constructed object.
  2. Anything composed of parts fitted and united together; a fabric; a structure.
  3. The structure of a person’s body; the human body.
    • 1855, Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”, XXXIV:
      There they stood, ranged along the hillsides, met / To view the last of me, a living frame / For one more picture! []
    • 1927-29, M.K. Gandhi, The Story of My Experiments with Truth, translated 1940 by Mahadev Desai, Part I, Chapter xi:
      The high school had a send-off in my honour. It was an uncommon thing for a young man of Rajkot to go to England. I had written out a few words of thanks. But I could scarcely stammer them out. I remember how my head reeled and how my whole frame shook as I stood up to read them.
  4. A rigid, generally rectangular mounting for paper, canvas or other flexible material.
  5. A piece of photographic film containing an image.
    • 12 July 2012, Sam Adams, AV Club Ice Age: Continental Drift
      If the audience had a nickel for every time a character on one side of the frame says something could never happen as it simultaneously happens on the other side of the frame, they’d have enough to pay the surcharge for the movie’s badly implemented 3-D.
  6. A context for understanding or interpretation.
  7. (snooker) A complete game of snooker, from break-off until all the balls (or as many as necessary to win) have been potted.
  8. (networking) An independent chunk of data sent over a network.
  9. (bowling) A set of balls whose results are added together for scoring purposes. Usually two balls, but only one ball in the case of a strike, and three balls in the case of a strike or a spare in the last frame of a game.
  10. (horticulture) A movable structure used for the cultivation or the sheltering of plants.
    a forcing-frame; a cucumber frame
  11. (philately) The outer decorated portion of a stamp’s image, often repeated on several issues although the inner picture may change.
  12. (philately) The outer circle of a cancellation mark.
  13. (electronics, film, animation, video games) A division of time on a multimedia timeline, such as 1/30th or 1/60th of a second.
  14. (Internet) An individually scrollable region of a webpage.
  15. (baseball, slang) An inning.
  16. (engineering, dated, chiefly Britain) Any of certain machines built upon or within framework.
    a stocking frame; a lace frame; a spinning frame
  17. (dated) Frame of mind; disposition.
    to be always in a happy frame
    • 1847, Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, chapter XVI:
      And I partook of the infinite calm in which she lay: my mind was never in a holier frame than while I gazed on that untroubled image of Divine rest.
  18. (obsolete) Contrivance; the act of devising or scheming.
  19. (dated, video games) A stage or level of a video game.
    • 1982, Gilsoft International, Mongoose (video game instructions) [2]
      When you play the game it will draw a set pattern depending on the frame you are on, with random additions to the pattern, to give a different orchard each time.
  20. (genetics, “reading frame”) A way of dividing nucleotide sequences into a set of consecutive triplets.
  21. (computing) A form of knowledge representation in artificial intelligence.
  22. (mathematics) A complete lattice in which meets distribute over arbitrary joins.

Quotations

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • feMRA, fream

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English frame.

Pronunciation

Noun

frame n (plural frames, diminutive framepje n)

  1. (snooker) frame
  2. (construction) frame

Anagrams

  • afrem, farme, rem af

German

Verb

frame

  1. inflection of framen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English frame.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfɹejm/, /ˈfɾejm/, /ˈfɾej.mi/

Noun

frame m (plural frames)

  1. (networking) frame (independent chunk of data)
  2. (Internet) frame (individually scrollable region of a webpage)
  3. frame (individual image emitted by a projector or monitor)

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