compose vs write what difference

what is difference between compose and write

English

Etymology

From Middle English composen, from Old French composer (to compose, compound, adjust, settle), from com- + poser, as an adaptation of Latin componere (to put together, compose), from com- (together) + ponere (to put, place)

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: kəm-pōzʹ, IPA(key): /kəmˈpoʊz/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: kəm-pōzʹ, IPA(key): /kəmˈpəʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Verb

compose (third-person singular simple present composes, present participle composing, simple past and past participle composed)

  1. (transitive) To make something by merging parts. [from later 15th c.]
    • December 22 1678, Thomas Sprat, A Sermon Preached before the King at White-Hall
      Zeal ought to be composed of the highest degrees of all pious affection.
  2. (transitive) To make up the whole; to constitute.
    • A few useful things [] compose their intellectual possessions.
  3. (transitive, nonstandard) To comprise.
  4. (transitive or intransitive) To construct by mental labor; to think up; particularly, to produce or create a literary or musical work.
    • 1714, Alexander Pope, Imitation of Horace, Book II. Sat. 6
      Let me [] compose / Something in Verse as true as Prose.
    • 1838, Benjamin Haydon, Painting, and the fine arts
      the genius that composed such works as the “Standard” and “Last Supper”
  5. (sometimes reflexive) To calm; to free from agitation.
    • Compose thy mind; / Nor frauds are here contrived, nor force designed.
  6. To arrange the elements of a photograph or other picture.
  7. To settle (an argument, dispute etc.); to come to a settlement.
    • 2010, Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22, Atlantic 2011, p. 280:
      By trying his best to compose matters with the mullahs, he had sincerely shown that he did not seek a violent collision []
  8. To arrange in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition.
    • In a peaceful grave my corpse compose.
  9. (printing, dated) To arrange (types) in a composing stick for printing; to typeset.

Synonyms

  • (make up the whole): constitute, form; see also Thesaurus:compose

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


French

Verb

compose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of composer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of composer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of composer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of composer
  5. second-person singular imperative of composer

Italian

Verb

compose

  1. third-person singular past historic of comporre


English

Etymology

From Middle English writen, from Old English wrītan (to incise, engrave, write, draw, bestow by writing), from Proto-West Germanic *wrītan, from Proto-Germanic *wrītaną (to carve, write), from Proto-Indo-European *wrey- (to rip, tear). Cognate with West Frisian write (to wear by rubbing, rip, tear), Dutch wrijten (to argue, quarrel), Middle Low German wrîten (to scratch, draw, write) (> Low German wrieten, rieten (to tear, split)), German reißen (to tear, rip), Norwegian rita (to rough-sketch, carve, write), Swedish rita (to draw, design, delineate, model), Icelandic rita (to cut, scratch, write), German ritzen (to carve, scratch), Proto-Slavic *ryti (to carve, engrave, dig), Polish ryć (to engrave, dig), Czech rýt (to engrave, dig). See also rit and rat.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: rīt, IPA(key): /ɹaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Homophones: right, rite, wright

Verb

write (third-person singular simple present writes, present participle writing, simple past wrote or (archaic) writ, past participle written or (archaic) writ or (obsolete) ywriten)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To form letters, words or symbols on a surface in order to communicate.
  2. (transitive) To be the author of (a book, article, poem, etc.).
  3. (transitive) To send written information to.
  4. (transitive) To show (information, etc) in written form.
  5. (ditransitive with relative clause) To convey a fact to someone via writing.
  6. (intransitive) To be an author.
  7. (computing, intransitive, with to) To record data mechanically or electronically.
  8. (transitive, South Africa, Canada, of an exam, a document, etc.) To fill in, to complete using words.
  9. To impress durably; to imprint; to engrave.
  10. To make known by writing; to record; to prove by one’s own written testimony; often used reflexively.
  11. (finance) To sell (an option or other derivative).
Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (form letters, words or symbols in order to communicate): inscribe, scrawl (indistinctly), scribble (quickly or imprecisely)
  • (be the author of): author, pen
  • (send (a letter) to): to post
  • (show (information, etc) in written form): display, indicate, mark, show
  • (computing: store (data)): save, store
  • (fill in, complete): sit (Commonwealth)
  • See also Thesaurus:write

Antonyms

  • (computing: store (data)): load, read, retrieve

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

write (plural writes)

  1. The act or style of writing.
    • 1938, The Bankers Monthly (volume 55, page 591)
      The pen also gives a better write than the ordinary counter pen. The ink stand cannot be stolen, for it is fastened to the counter or desk.
  2. (computing) The operation of storing data, as in memory or onto disk.
    How many writes per second can this hard disk handle?
    • 2006, MySQL administrator’s guide and language reference (page 393)
      In other words, the system can do 1200 reads per second with no writes, the average write is twice as slow as the average read, and the relationship is linear.

Derived terms

  • quick-write

References

  • write in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • write in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • twier, twire

Middle English

Verb

write

  1. Alternative form of writen

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian wrīta, from Proto-Germanic *wrītaną. Cognate with English write, Dutch wrijten.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvritə/

Verb

write

  1. to rip, to tear
  2. to be painful, to sting

Inflection

Further reading

“write”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


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