compute vs figure what difference

what is difference between compute and figure

English

Etymology

17th century. Borrowed from French computer, from Latin computō (calculate, compute). Doublet of count.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kəm-pyo͞ot’, IPA(key): /kəmˈpjuːt/
  • Hyphenation: com‧pute
  • Rhymes: -uːt

Verb

compute (third-person singular simple present computes, present participle computing, simple past and past participle computed)

  1. (transitive) to reckon, calculate
  2. (intransitive, informal) to make sense (commonly used in mimicry of a science fictional robot and spoken in a robotic voice; most frequently in negative contexts)

Related terms

Translations

Noun

compute (uncountable)

  1. (computing, informal) computational power
    • 2015, J. Powell, Mastering vRealize Automation 6.2 (page 41)
      Once you have the total, does it exceed the maximum amount of compute that can be served up in your vCenter environment? It is quite normal for users to consume everything you provide.
    • 2016, Joe Baron, Hisham Baz, Tim Bixler, AWS Certified Solutions Architect Official Study Guide: Associate Exam
      To change the amount of compute and memory, you can select a different DB Instance class of the database.

Further reading

  • compute in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • compute in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.pyt/
  • Homophones: computent, computes

Verb

compute

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of computer
  2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of computer
  3. second-person singular imperative of computer

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: com‧pu‧te

Verb

compute

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of computar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of computar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of computar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of computar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /komˈpute/, [kõmˈpu.t̪e]

Verb

compute

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of computar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of computar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of computar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of computar.


English

Etymology

From Middle English figure, borrowed from Old French figure, from Latin figūra (form, shape, form of a word, a figure of speech, Late Latin a sketch, drawing), from fingō (to form, shape, mold, fashion), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeyǵʰ- (to mold, shape, form, knead). Cognate with Ancient Greek τεῖχος (teîkhos), Sanskrit देग्धि (degdhi), Old English dāg (dough). More at dough. Doublet of figura.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡjɚ/, /ˈfɪɡɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡə/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ˈfɪɡɚ/, /ˈfɪɡjɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪɡə(ɹ), -ɪɡjə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: fig‧ure

Noun

figure (plural figures)

  1. A drawing or diagram conveying information.
  2. The representation of any form, as by drawing, painting, modelling, carving, embroidering, etc.; especially, a representation of the human body.
    a figure in bronze; a figure cut in marble
  3. A person or thing representing a certain consciousness.
  4. The appearance or impression made by the conduct or career of a person.
    He cut a sorry figure standing there in the rain.
    • I made some figure there.
    • 1770, William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England
      gentlemen of the best figure in the county
  5. (obsolete) Distinguished appearance; magnificence; conspicuous representation; splendour; show.
    • 1729, William Law, A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life
      that he may live in figure and indulgence
  6. A human figure, which dress or corset must fit to; the shape of a human body.
  7. A numeral.
  8. A number, an amount.
  9. A shape.
  10. A visible pattern as in wood or cloth.
    The muslin was of a pretty figure.
  11. Any complex dance moveW.
  12. A figure of speech.
  13. (logic) The form of a syllogism with respect to the relative position of the middle term.
  14. (astrology) A horoscope; the diagram of the aspects of the astrological houses.
    • 1889, Franz Hartmann, The Principles of Astrological Geomancy
      its quality, like those of all the rest, is determined by its position in the house of the astrological figure
  15. (music) Any short succession of notes, either as melody or as a group of chords, which produce a single complete and distinct impression.
    • 1888, George Grove, Beethoven’s Nine Symphonies: Analytical Essays
      Here, Beethoven limits the syncopations and modifications of rhythm which are so prominent in the first and third movements, and employs a rapid, busy, and most melodious figure in the Violins, which is irresistible in its gay and brilliant effect []
  16. (music) A form of melody or accompaniment kept up through a strain or passage; a motif; a florid embellishment.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • figurine
  • figurative
  • figuratively

Descendants

  • Japanese: フィギュア (figyua)

Translations

Verb

figure (third-person singular simple present figures, present participle figuring, simple past and past participle figured)

  1. (chiefly US) To calculate, to solve a mathematical problem.
  2. (chiefly US) To come to understand.
  3. To think, to assume, to suppose, to reckon.
  4. (chiefly US, intransitive) To be reasonable.
  5. (intransitive) To enter into; to be a part of.
  6. (obsolete) To represent by a figure, as to form or mould; to make an image of, either palpable or ideal; also, to fashion into a determinate form; to shape.
  7. To embellish with design; to adorn with figures.
  8. (obsolete) To indicate by numerals.
    • 1698 , John Dryden, Epitaph of Mary Frampton
      As through a crystal glass the figured hours are seen.
  9. To represent by a metaphor; to signify or symbolize.
  10. (obsolete) To prefigure; to foreshow.
  11. (music) To write over or under the bass, as figures or other characters, in order to indicate the accompanying chords.
  12. (music) To embellish.

Derived terms

  • go figure
  • prefigure
  • figure on
  • figure out (US)

Translations

Further reading

  • figure in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • figure in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin figūra.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fi.ɡyʁ/

Noun

figure f (plural figures)

  1. face
  2. figure

Synonyms

  • visage

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “figure” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiˈɡu.re/
  • Rhymes: -ure

Noun

figure f

  1. plural of figura

Portuguese

Verb

figure

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of figurar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of figurar
  3. third-person singular negative imperative of figurar
  4. third-person singular imperative of figurar

Spanish

Verb

figure

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of figurar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of figurar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of figurar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of figurar.

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