concede vs grant what difference

what is difference between concede and grant

English

Etymology

From Middle English [Term?], from Old French conceder, from Latin concedō (give way, yield), from con- (wholly) + cedō (to yield, give way, to go, grant), from Proto-Indo-European *ked- (to go, yield).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈsiːd/
  • Rhymes: -iːd

Verb

concede (third-person singular simple present concedes, present participle conceding, simple past and past participle conceded)

  1. To yield or suffer; to surrender; to grant
    I have to concede the argument.
    He conceded the race once it was clear he could not win.
    Kendall conceded defeat once she realized she could not win in a battle of wits.
  2. To grant, as a right or privilege; to make concession of.
  3. To admit to be true; to acknowledge.
  4. To yield or make concession.
  5. (sports) To have a goal or point scored against
  6. (cricket) (of a bowler) to have runs scored off of one’s bowling.

Synonyms

  • (surrender): capitulate, give up; See also Thesaurus:surrender
  • (in sports): let in
  • (yield or make concession): accede, come around, give way; See also Thesaurus:accede

Related terms

  • concession

Translations


Galician

Verb

concede

  1. third-person singular present indicative of conceder
  2. second-person singular imperative of conceder

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /konˈt͡ʃɛ.de/
  • Rhymes: -ɛde

Verb

concede

  1. third-person singular present indicative of concedere

Latin

Verb

concēde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of concēdō

Portuguese

Verb

concede

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of conceder
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of conceder

Romanian

Etymology

From French concéder.

Verb

a concede (third-person singular present conced, past participle conces3rd conj.

  1. to concede

Conjugation


Spanish

Verb

concede

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of conceder.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of conceder.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of conceder.


English

Alternative forms

  • graunt (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English granten, graunten, grantien, grauntien, from Anglo-Norman granter, graunter, from Old French granter, graunter, graanter, greanter (to promise, assure, guarantee, confirm, ratify), from a merger of Old French garantir, guarantir (to guarantee, assure, vouch for) (see English guarantee) and earlier cranter, craanter, creanter (to allow, permit), from an assumed Medieval Latin *credentāre, from Latin credere (to believe, trust). More at guarantee, credit.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡɹɑːnt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡɹænt/
  • (Mid-Atlantic Accent) IPA(key): /ɡɹɒnt/
  • Rhymes: -ænt, -ɑːnt

Verb

grant (third-person singular simple present grants, present participle granting, simple past and past participle granted)

  1. (ditransitive) to give (permission or wish)
  2. (ditransitive) To bestow or confer, with or without compensation, particularly in answer to prayer or request; to give.(Can we add an example for this sense?)
    • 1668 July 3, James Dalrymple, “Thomas Rue contra Andrew Houſtoun” in The Deciſions of the Lords of Council & Seſſion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 548:
      He Suſpends on theſe Reaſons, that Thomas Rue had granted a general Diſcharge to Adam Muſhet, who was his Conjunct, and correus debendi, after the alleadged Service, which Diſcharged Muſhet, and conſequently Houstoun his Partner.
  3. (transitive) To agree with (someone) on (something); to accept (something) for the sake of argument; to admit to (someone) that (something) is true.
    Synonyms: concur, concede, allow
    • a. 1921, George Bernard Shaw, Back to Methuselah, Preface (“The Infidel Half Century”), section “In Quest of the First Cause”:
      The universe exists, said the father: somebody must have made it. If that somebody exists, said I, somebody must have made him. I grant that for the sake of argument, said the Oratorian.
  4. (intransitive) To assent; to consent.

Translations

Noun

grant (plural grants)

  1. The act of granting; a bestowing or conferring; concession; allowance; permission.
  2. The yielding or admission of something in dispute.
  3. The thing or property granted; a gift; a boon.
  4. (law) A transfer of property by deed or writing; especially, an appropriation or conveyance made by the government.
  5. The deed or writing by which such a transfer is made.
  6. (informal) An application for a grant (monetary boon to aid research or the like).

Translations

Anagrams

  • Trang

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡrant]

Noun

grant m

  1. grant (the thing or property granted; a gift; a boon)

Derived terms

  • grantový

Related terms

  • See krédo

Further reading

  • grant in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • grant in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Franco-Provençal

Alternative forms

  • grand

Etymology

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grant m (feminine singular grant or granta, masculine plural grants, feminine plural grants or grantes)

  1. big, large

Derived terms


Friulian

Alternative forms

  • grand (alternative orthography)

Etymology

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grant

  1. big, large

Middle French

Adjective

grant m or f (plural grans)

  1. (early Middle French) Alternative form of grand

Norwegian Nynorsk

Adjective

grant

  1. neuter singular of grann

Old French

Etymology

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grant m (oblique and nominative feminine singular grant or grande)

  1. big, large

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle French: grand
    • French: grand
  • Norman: grand
  • Picard: grand
  • English: grand

Old Spanish

Alternative forms

  • grand (alternative spelling)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡɾãnt], [ɡɾãn]

Adjective

grant m or f (plural grandes)

  1. Apocopic form of grande; great; big; large.
    • c. 1200: Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 18r.
      Fue el dia ṫcero al alba dela man. ¬ vinẏerȯ truenos ¬ relȧpagos ¬ nuf grȧt ſobrel mȯt.

      On the morning of the third day there came thunder and flashes of lightning and a great cloud upon the mountain.

Descendants

  • Spanish: gran

Swedish

Adjective

grant

  1. absolute indefinite neuter singular of grann.

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