concede vs profess what difference

what is difference between concede and profess

English

Etymology

From Middle English [Term?], from Old French conceder, from Latin concedō (give way, yield), from con- (wholly) + cedō (to yield, give way, to go, grant), from Proto-Indo-European *ked- (to go, yield).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈsiːd/
  • Rhymes: -iːd

Verb

concede (third-person singular simple present concedes, present participle conceding, simple past and past participle conceded)

  1. To yield or suffer; to surrender; to grant
    I have to concede the argument.
    He conceded the race once it was clear he could not win.
    Kendall conceded defeat once she realized she could not win in a battle of wits.
  2. To grant, as a right or privilege; to make concession of.
  3. To admit to be true; to acknowledge.
  4. To yield or make concession.
  5. (sports) To have a goal or point scored against
  6. (cricket) (of a bowler) to have runs scored off of one’s bowling.

Synonyms

  • (surrender): capitulate, give up; See also Thesaurus:surrender
  • (in sports): let in
  • (yield or make concession): accede, come around, give way; See also Thesaurus:accede

Related terms

  • concession

Translations


Galician

Verb

concede

  1. third-person singular present indicative of conceder
  2. second-person singular imperative of conceder

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /konˈt͡ʃɛ.de/
  • Rhymes: -ɛde

Verb

concede

  1. third-person singular present indicative of concedere

Latin

Verb

concēde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of concēdō

Portuguese

Verb

concede

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of conceder
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of conceder

Romanian

Etymology

From French concéder.

Verb

a concede (third-person singular present conced, past participle conces3rd conj.

  1. to concede

Conjugation


Spanish

Verb

concede

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of conceder.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of conceder.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of conceder.


English

Etymology

From Old French professer, and its source, the participle stem of Latin profitērī, from pro- + fatērī (to confess, acknowledge).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɹəˈfɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Verb

profess (third-person singular simple present professes, present participle professing, simple past and past participle professed)

  1. (transitive, chiefly passive) To administer the vows of a religious order to (someone); to admit to a religious order. [from 14th c.]
    • 2000, Butler’s Lives of the Saints, p.118:
      This swayed the balance decisively in Mary’s favour, and she was professed on 8 September 1578.
  2. (reflexive) To declare oneself (to be something). [from 16th c.]
    • 2011, Alex Needham, The Guardian, 9 Dec.:
      Kiefer professes himself amused by the fuss that ensued when he announced that he was buying the Mülheim-Kärlich reactor [].
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To declare; to assert, affirm. [from 16th c.]
    • c. 1604, William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure, First Folio 1623:
      He professes to haue receiued no sinister measure from his Iudge, but most willingly humbles himselfe to the determination of Iustice [].
    • 1974, ‘The Kansas Kickbacks’, Time, 11 Feb 1974:
      The Governor immediately professed that he knew nothing about the incident.
  4. (transitive) To make a claim (to be something); to lay claim to (a given quality, feeling etc.), often with connotations of insincerity. [from 16th c.]
    • 2010, Hélène Mulholland, The Guardian, 28 Sep 2010:
      Ed Miliband professed ignorance of the comment when he was approached by the BBC later.
  5. (transitive) To declare one’s adherence to (a religion, deity, principle etc.). [from 16th c.]
    • 1983, Alexander Mcleish, The Frontier Peoples of India, Mittal Publications 1984, p.122:
      The remainder of the population, about two-thirds, belongs to the Mongolian race and professes Buddhism.
  6. (transitive) To work as a professor of; to teach. [from 16th c.]
  7. (transitive, now rare) To claim to have knowledge or understanding of (a given area of interest, subject matter). [from 16th c.]

Related terms

  • profession

Translations

Further reading

  • profess in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • profess in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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