conceive vs think what difference

what is difference between conceive and think

English

Alternative forms

  • conceave (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English conceyven, from Old French concevoir, conceveir, from Latin concipiō, concipere (to take), from con- (together) + capiō (to take). Compare deceive, perceive, receive.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈsiːv/
  • Rhymes: -iːv

Verb

conceive (third-person singular simple present conceives, present participle conceiving, simple past and past participle conceived)

  1. (transitive) To develop an idea; to form in the mind; to plan; to devise; to originate.
    • 1606, Antony and Cleopatra, Shakespeare, II-4
      We shall, / As I conceive the journey, be at the Mount / Before you, Lepidus.
    • It was among the ruins of the Capitol that I first conceived the idea of a work which has amused and exercised near twenty years of my life.
  2. (transitive) To understand (someone).
    • I conceive you.
    • You will hardly conceive him to have been bred in the same climate.
  3. (intransitive or transitive) To become pregnant (with).
    • She hath also conceived a son in her old age.
  4. To generate or engender; to bring into being.

Related terms

  • conceivable
  • conceiver
  • concept
  • conception

Translations

Further reading

  • conceive in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • conceive in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Middle English

Verb

conceive

  1. Alternative form of conceyven


English

Alternative forms

  • thinck, thinke (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: thĭngk, IPA(key): /θɪŋk/
  • (Appalachian) IPA(key): [θæŋk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Etymology 1

From Middle English thinken, thynken, thenken, thenchen, from Old English þenċan, þenċean (to think), from Proto-Germanic *þankijaną (to think, suppose, perceive), from Proto-Indo-European *teng- (to think, feel, know). Cognate with Scots think, thynk (to think), North Frisian teenk, taanke, tanke, tånke (to think), Saterland Frisian toanke (to think), West Frisian tinke (to think), Dutch denken (to think), Afrikaans dink (to think), Low German denken (to think), dinken, German denken (to think), Danish tænke (to think), Swedish tänka (to think), Norwegian Bokmål tenke (to think), Norwegian Nynorsk tenkja (to think), Icelandic þekkja (to know, recognise, identify, perceive), Latin tongeō (know).

Verb

think (third-person singular simple present thinks, present participle thinking, simple past and past participle thought)

  1. (transitive) To ponder, to go over in one’s head.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! Certainly it made a brave picture. I had seen similar ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills, [] a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one’s dreams.
  2. (intransitive) To communicate to oneself in one’s mind, to try to find a solution to a problem.
  3. (intransitive) To conceive of something or someone (usually followed by of; infrequently, by on).
  4. (transitive) To be of opinion (that); to consider, judge, regard, or look upon (something) as.
    • 1865, Henry David Thoreau, Cape Cod, Chapter IX. “The Sea and the Desert”, page 182.
      [] one man showed me a young oak which he had transplanted from behind the town, thinking it an apple-tree.
  5. (transitive) To guess; to reckon.
  6. To plan; to be considering; to be of a mind (to do something).
    • The cupbearer shrugged up his shoulders in displeasure. “I thought to have lodged him in the solere chamber,” said he []
  7. To presume; to venture.
    • Think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father.
Conjugation
Synonyms
  • (ponder): See Thesaurus:ponder
  • (communicate to oneself in one’s mind): See Thesaurus:think
  • (be of the opinion (that)): See Thesaurus:have opinion
  • (guess, reckon): guess See Thesaurus:suppose
  • (consider, judge, regard something as): See Thesaurus:deem
Derived terms
Related terms
  • forthink
  • thought
  • thunk
  • thank
Translations

Noun

think (usually uncountable, plural thinks)

  1. (chiefly Britain) An act of thinking; consideration (of something).
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English thinken, thynken, thenken (also thinchen, thünchen), from Old English þyncan (to seem, appear), from Proto-Germanic *þunkijaną (to seem). Cognate with Dutch dunken (to seem, appear), German dünken (to seem, appear), Danish tykkes (to seem), Swedish tycka (to seem, think, regard), Icelandic þykja (to be regarded, be considered, seem). More at methinks.

Verb

think (third-person singular simple present thinks, present participle thinking, simple past and past participle thought)

  1. (obsolete except in methinks) To seem, to appear.
Translations

References


Scots

Etymology

From earlier thynk, from Middle English thynken, thinken, from Old English þencan, þenċean.

Verb

think (third-person singular present thinks, present participle thinking, past thocht, past participle thocht)

  1. (transitive) to think, to conceive, to have in mind
  2. (transitive) to believe, to hold as an opinion, to judge; to feel, to have as an emotion
  3. (transitive or intransitive) to ponder, to meditate, to consider, to reflect on
  4. (transitive or intransitive) to have scruples, to doubt, to reconsider
  5. to devise, to work out, to contrive
  6. (archaic, with shame) to be ashamed

Noun

think (plural thinks)

  1. thought, opinion, frequently one’s own opinion

References

  • “think” in Dictionary of the Scots Language, Scottish Language Dictionaries, Edinburgh, retrieved 19 June 2018.

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