concentre vs focus what difference

what is difference between concentre and focus

English

Alternative forms

  • concenter (now US)

Etymology

con- +‎ centre

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɑnˈsɛntɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɒnˈsɛntə/
  • Hyphenation: con‧cen‧tre
  • Rhymes: -ɛntə(ɹ)

Verb

concentre (third-person singular simple present concentres, present participle concentring, simple past and past participle concentred)

  1. (British spelling, archaic, intransitive) To come together at a common centre.
    • 1613, Henry Peacham, “To the Buried Prince” in The Period of Mourning, London: John Helme,[1]
      As from each angle of the Vault
      Wherein thou lyest, a line is brought
      Vnto the Kingly founders heart;
      So vnto thee, from euery part,
      See how our loues doe runne by line,
      And dead, concenter in thy Shrine.
    • 17th–18th century (reprinted 1850), William Beveridge, “The Sacerdotal Benediction in the Name of the Trinity”, reprinted in Twenty-six Sermons on Various Subjects Selected from the Works of the Right Rev. William Beveridge, D.D. Lord Bishop of St. Asaph[2], London: Printed for the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, OCLC 697897263, page 80:
      Hence, [] whatsoever perfections or properties (except such as are purely personal) are attributed to any of these divine Persons, are the same in all, and may equally be attributed to every one; they being all and every one the same God, in whom all perfections concentre, or, rather, who is all perfection itself.
    • 1760, Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, London: R. and J. Dodsley, Volume 2, Chapter 19, p. 170,[3]
      [] the medulla oblongata, wherein it was generally agreed by Dutch anatomists, that all the minute nerves from all the organs of the seven senses concentered, like streets and winding alleys, into a square.
    • 1804, William Clark, The Journals of Lewis and Clark:
      Capt. Lewis walked on Shore above this Creek and discovered a high moun from the top of which he had an extensive view, 3 paths Concentering at the moun
  2. (British spelling, archaic, intransitive) To coincide.
    • 1686, Charles Cotton (translator), Essays of Michael, Seigneur de Montaigne, London: T. Basset et al., Book 3, Chapter 5, p. 156,[4]
      Are we not sufficiently Brutes, to call that work brutish which begets us? [] All Opinions concenter in this []
  3. (British spelling, archaic, transitive) To bring together at a common centre.
    • 1648, Robert Herrick, Epigram “To the most accomplisht Gentleman, Master Edward Norgate, Clark of the Signet to His Majesty” in Hesperides, London: John Williams and Francis Eglesfield, p. 138,[5]
      For one so rarely tun’d to fit all parts;
      For one to whom espous’d are all the Arts;
      Long have I sought for: but co’d never see
      Them all concenter’d in one man, but Thee.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 8, lines 104-107,[6]
      thir bright officious Lamps,
      Light above Light, for thee alone, as seems,
      In thee concentring all thir precious beams
      Of sacred influence:
    • 1750, Samuel Johnson, The Rambler, No. 61, Tuesday, 16 October, 1750, in The Rambler, Volume 2, London: J. Payne and J. Bouquet, 1752, p. 221,[7]
      Whatever has distinguished the hero; whatever has elevated the wit; whatever has indeared the lover, are all concentered in Mr Frolick, whose life has, for seven years, been a regular interchange of intrigues, dangers, and waggeries []
    • 1795, Helen Maria Williams, Letters Containing a Sketch of the Politics of France, London: G. G. and J. Robinson, Letter 8, p. 230,[8]
      [] for he never on any occasion displayed his sensibility to mortifications, which was in proportion to his excessive vanity, but concentred within his vindictive soul his disgrace, his resentment, and his projects of vengeance.
  4. (British spelling, archaic, transitive) To focus.
    • 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Chapter 23,[9]
      For an instant, the gaze of the horror-stricken multitude was concentred on the ghastly miracle []
    • 1885, George Meredith, Diana of the Crossways, London: Chapman & Hall, Volume 1, Chapter 14, pp. 194-195,[10]
      At Princess Paryli’s Ball two young men of singular elegance were observed by Diana, little though she concentered her attention on any figures of the groups.
    • 1908, Edward Carpenter, The Intermediate Sex, London: Swan Sonnenschein, Chapter 4, p. 83,[11]
      Education has been concentred on intellectual (and physical) development; but the affections have been left to take care of themselves.
  5. (British spelling, archaic, transitive) To condense, to concentrate.
    • 1917, Frank Dilnot, Lloyd George: The Man and His Story, New York: Harper, Chapter 11, p. 163,[12]
      As new discoveries were made incidental difficulties connected with the filling of shells occupied the concentered study of the manufacturers.

Derived terms

  • concentric

Synonyms

  • (come together at a common centre): converge

Anagrams

  • concenter, connecter, reconnect

French

Verb

concentre

  1. first-person singular present indicative of concentrer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of concentrer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of concentrer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of concentrer
  5. second-person singular imperative of concentrer

Anagrams

  • connecter

Portuguese

Verb

concentre

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of concentrar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of concentrar
  3. first-person singular imperative of concentrar
  4. third-person singular imperative of concentrar

Spanish

Verb

concentre

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of concentrar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of concentrar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of concentrar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of concentrar.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin focus (hearth, fireplace); see there for more.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfəʊ.kəs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfoʊ.kəs/
  • Rhymes: -əʊkəs

Noun

focus (countable and uncountable, plural foci or focuses or focusses)

  1. (countable, optics) A point at which reflected or refracted rays of light converge.
  2. (countable, geometry) A point of a conic at which rays reflected from a curve or surface converge.
  3. (uncountable, photography, cinematography) The fact of the convergence of light on the photographic medium.
  4. (uncountable, photography, cinematography) The quality of the convergence of light on the photographic medium.
  5. (uncountable) Concentration of attention.
  6. (countable, seismology) The exact point of where an earthquake occurs, in three dimensions (underneath the epicentre).
  7. (graphical user interface) The indicator of the currently active element in a user interface.
  8. (linguistics) The most important word or phrase in a sentence or passage, or the one that imparts information.
  9. An object used in casting a magic spell.
    • 2004, Marian Singer, Trish MacGregor, The Only Wiccan Spell Book You’ll Ever Need
      Candles, in fact, are an essential ingredient in many spells. They can be used as either the focus of the spell or as a component that sets the spell’s overall mood and tone.
    • 2014, Kristen S. Walker, Witch Gate (page 180)
      I ran through what I knew about spells from Mom and other witchcraft sources, but nothing matched what I was used to seeing in her magic work. Usually she used herbs and other plants as a focus for the spell.

Derived terms

  • focus hunting

Translations

Verb

focus (third-person singular simple present focuses or focusses, present participle focusing or focussing, simple past and past participle focused or focussed)

  1. (intransitive, followed by on or upon) To concentrate during a task.
  2. (transitive) To direct attention, effort, or energy to a particular audience or task.
  3. (transitive) To cause (rays of light, etc) to converge at a single point.
  4. (transitive) To adjust (a lens, an optical instrument) in order to position an image with respect to the focal plane.
    You’ll need to focus the microscope carefully in order to capture the full detail of this surface.
  5. (intransitive) To concentrate one’s attention.
    If you’re going to beat your competitors, you need to focus.
  6. (computing, graphical user interface, transitive) To transfer the input focus to (a visual element), so that it receives subsequent input.
    The text box won’t receive the user’s keystrokes unless you explicitly focus it.

Usage notes

The spellings focusses, focussing, focussed are more common in Commonwealth English than in American English, but in both varieties they are less common than the spellings focuses, focusing, focused.

Derived terms

  • focus group
  • in focus
  • out of focus
  • soft focus

Related terms

  • focal

Translations

Anagrams

  • Fusco

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin focus. Compare the inherited doublet foc.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfɔ.kus/

Noun

focus m (plural focus)

  1. focus

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from New Latin focus. The figurative sense probably derives from English focus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfoː.kʏs/
  • Hyphenation: fo‧cus

Noun

focus m (plural focussen)

  1. (optics, physics) focus
    Synonym: brandpunt
  2. (figuratively) focus, centre
  3. (linguistics) focus

Derived terms

  • focaal
  • focusafstand
  • focussen

Related terms

  • foyer

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: fokus

References


Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin focus, whence also Italian fuoco (an inherited doublet).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔ.kus/
  • Hyphenation: fò‧cus

Noun

focus m (invariable)

  1. focus (all senses)

Anagrams

  • Fusco

Latin

Etymology

  • The origin is uncertain. Usually connected with Old Armenian բոց (bocʿ).
  • Some connect this along with faciēs, facētus, fax to Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to shine). In that case, cognate at the root level with Sanskrit भाति (bhā́ti), Ancient Greek φαίνω (phaínō, to shine), etc.
  • In explaining how Kepler discovered the elliptical orbits, Nicholas Mee provides this explanation:

“One of the interesting properties of an ellipse is that if there were a light bulb at one focus, then all the light that it emits would reflect off the ellipse and converge at the other focus. This is why Kepler originally used the name focus for these points.” (Gravity, 2014, p. 74)

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfo.kus/, [ˈfɔkʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfo.kus/, [ˈfɔːkus]

Noun

focus m (genitive focī); second declension

  1. fireplace, hearth
  2. firepan, coal pan, brazier
  3. (figuratively) house, family
  4. (Vulgar Latin) fire

Declension

Second-declension noun.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • focillare
  • foculare

Synonyms

  • (fire): ignis

Descendants

References

  • focus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • focus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • focus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • focus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • focus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • focus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

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