conclude vs resolve what difference

what is difference between conclude and resolve

English

Etymology

From Middle English concluden, borrowed from Latin conclūdere (to shut up, close, end), present active infinitive of conclūdō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kən.ˈkluːd/

Verb

conclude (third-person singular simple present concludes, present participle concluding, simple past and past participle concluded)

  1. (intransitive) To end; to come to an end.
    The story concluded with a moral.
  2. (transitive) To bring to an end; to close; to finish.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      I will conclude this part with the speech of a counsellor of state.
  3. (transitive) To bring about as a result; to effect; to make.
    to conclude a bargain
  4. (transitive) To come to a conclusion, to a final decision.
    From the evidence, I conclude that this man was murdered.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion to Societies
      No man can certainly conclude God’s love or hatred to any person by anything that befalls him.
  5. (obsolete) To make a final determination or judgment concerning; to judge; to decide.
    • 1717, Joseph Addison, Metamorphoses
      But no frail man, however great or high, / Can be concluded blest before he die.
  6. To shut off; to restrain; to limit; to estop; to bar; generally in the passive.
    The defendant is concluded by his own plea.
    A judgment concludes the introduction of further evidence.
    • 1677, Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature
      If therefore they will appeal to revelation for their creation they must be concluded by it.
  7. (obsolete) To shut up; to enclose.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      The very person of Christ [was] concluded within the grave.
  8. (obsolete) To include; to comprehend; to shut up together; to embrace; to confine.
  9. (logic) to deduce, to infer (develop a causal relation)

Antonyms

  • (to end): begin, initiate, start, commence

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /konˈklu.de/
  • Rhymes: -ude

Verb

conclude

  1. third-person singular present indicative of concludere

Latin

Verb

conclūde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of conclūdō


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English resolven, from Old French resolver, a learned borrowing of Latin resolvō (loosen, thaw, melt, resolve), equivalent to re- +‎ solve.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈzɒlv/, /ɹiːˈzɒlv/
  • Rhymes: -ɒlv or Rhymes: -ɒlv
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈzɑlv/

Verb

resolve (third-person singular simple present resolves, present participle resolving, simple past and past participle resolved)

  1. (transitive) To find a solution to (a problem).
  2. (transitive) To reduce to simple or intelligible notions; to make clear or certain; to unravel; to explain.
  3. (intransitive) To make a firm decision to do something.
  4. (transitive) To determine or decide in purpose; to make ready in mind; to fix; to settle.
  5. To come to an agreement or make peace; patch up relationship, settle differences, bury the hatchet.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, reflexive) To break down into constituent parts; to decompose; to disintegrate; to return to a simpler constitution or a primeval state.
    • 1665, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour
      Ye immortal souls, who once were men, / And now resolved to elements again.
  7. To cause to perceive or understand; to acquaint; to inform; to convince; to assure; to make certain.
    • 1596, Walter Raleigh, The discovery of the large, rich, and beautiful Empire of Guiana, with a relation of the great and golden city of Manoa
      In health, good air, pleasure, riches, I am resolved it cannot be equalled by any region.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      She was proceeding in this manner when the surgeon entered the room. The lieutenant immediately asked how his patient did. But he resolved him only by saying, “Better, I believe, than he would have been by this time, if I had not been called; and even as it is, perhaps it would have been lucky if I could have been called sooner.”
  8. (music) To cause a chord to go from dissonance to consonance.
  9. (optics) To render visible or distinguishable the parts of something.
  10. (computing) To find the IP address of a hostname, or the entity referred to by a symbol in source code; to look up.
  11. (rare, transitive) To melt; to dissolve; to liquefy or soften (a solid).
  12. (rare, intransitive, reflexive) To melt; to dissolve; to become liquid.
    • 1730, John Arbuthnot, An Essay Concerning the Nature of Aliments
      When the blood stagnates in any part, it first coagulates, then resolves, and turns alkaline.
  13. (obsolete, transitive) To liquefy (a gas or vapour).
  14. (medicine, dated) To disperse or scatter; to discuss, as an inflammation or a tumour.
  15. (obsolete) To relax; to lay at ease.
    • 1641, Ben Jonson, Discoveries Made upon Men and Matter
      resolve himself into all sports and looseness again
  16. (chemistry) To separate racemic compounds into their enantiomers.
  17. (mathematics, archaic, transitive) To solve (an equation, etc.).
Derived terms
  • resolvable
  • resolver
Translations
References
  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “resolve”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Noun

resolve (countable and uncountable, plural resolves)

  1. Determination; will power.
    It took all my resolve to go through with the surgery.
  2. A determination to do something; a fixed decision.
    • 1995, William Arctander O’Brien, Novalis, Signs of Revolution (page 56)
      His resolve to die is weakening as he grows accustomed to Sophie’s absence, and all his attempts to master irresolution only augment it.
  3. (countable) An act of resolving something; resolution.
    • 2008, Matt Lombard, SolidWorks 2007 Bible (page 956)
      Some operations require data that, in turn, requires that lightweight components be resolved. In these cases, this option determines whether the user is prompted to approve the resolve or whether components are just resolved automatically.
Synonyms
  • fortitude, inner strength, resoluteness, sticktoitiveness, tenacity
Translations
See also
  • set of one’s jaw

Etymology 2

re- +‎ solve

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹiˈsɒlv/
  • Rhymes: -ɒlv
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɹiˈsɑlv/
  • Rhymes: -ɑlv

Verb

resolve (third-person singular simple present resolves, present participle resolving, simple past and past participle resolved)

  1. (transitive) To solve again.
Translations

Anagrams

  • reloves

Italian

Verb

resolve

  1. third-person singular present indicative of resolvere

Anagrams

  • solvere, svelerò, svolere, velsero

Latin

Verb

resolve

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of resolvō

Portuguese

Verb

resolve

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of resolver
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of resolver

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