condense vs desiccate what difference

what is difference between condense and desiccate

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French condenser, from Latin condensare.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈdɛns/

Verb

condense (third-person singular simple present condenses, present participle condensing, simple past and past participle condensed)

  1. (transitive) To concentrate toward the essence by making more close, compact, or dense, thereby decreasing size or volume.
    Synonyms: thicken, simplify, (cooking) reduce; see also Thesaurus:compress
    Antonym: dilute
    • The secret course pursued both at Brussels and at Madrid may be condensed into the usual formula, dissimulation, procrastination, and again dissimulation.
  2. (transitive, chemistry) To transform from a gaseous state into a liquid state via condensation.
  3. (intransitive, chemistry) To be transformed from a gaseous state into a liquid state.

Derived terms

  • condensing locomotive

Related terms

  • condensation

Translations

Adjective

condense (comparative more condense, superlative most condense)

  1. (archaic) Condensed; compact; dense.

References

  • condense at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • condense in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • Homophones: condensent, condenses

Verb

condense

  1. first-person singular present indicative of condenser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of condenser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of condenser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of condenser
  5. second-person singular imperative of condenser

Italian

Noun

condense f

  1. plural of condensa

Anagrams

  • censendo

Latin

Adjective

condēnse

  1. vocative masculine singular of condēnsus

Portuguese

Verb

condense

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of condensar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of condensar
  3. first-person singular imperative of condensar
  4. third-person singular imperative of condensar

Spanish

Verb

condense

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of condensar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of condensar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of condensar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of condensar.


English

Etymology

From Latin dēsiccāre (to dry completely, dry up) +‎ -ate (verb suffix indicating acting in the specified manner). Dēsiccāre is derived from dēsiccō (to desiccate, dry up; to drain dry) (from dē- (prefix meaning ‘completely, to exhaustion’) + siccō (to dry; to drain, exhaust), from siccus (dry), from Proto-Indo-European *seyk-) + -āre.

The adjective is derived from Latin dēsiccātus (dried up), the perfect passive participle of dēsiccō: see above. The noun is derived from the adjective.

Pronunciation

  • Verb and adjective:
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdɛsɪkeɪt/, (archaic) /dɪˈsɪkeɪt/
    • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈdɛsɪkeɪt/
  • Noun:
    • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈdɛsɪkət/
  • Hyphenation: de‧sic‧cate

Verb

desiccate (third-person singular simple present desiccates, present participle desiccating, simple past and past participle desiccated)

  1. (transitive) To remove moisture from; to dry. [from late 16th c.]
    Synonyms: dehydrate, (obsolete) exiccate, exsiccate, parch
    Antonyms: hydrate, moisten, moisturize, wet
  2. (transitive) To preserve by drying. [from late 16th c.]
  3. (intransitive, rare) To become dry; to dry up.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

desiccate (comparative more desiccate, superlative most desiccate)

  1. Having had moisture removed; dehydrated, dessicated.
    Synonym: dried

Translations

Noun

desiccate (plural desiccates)

  1. A substance which has been dessicated, that is, had its moisture removed.

Translations

References

Further reading

  • dessication on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • cadetcies

Latin

Verb

dēsiccāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of dēsiccō

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