confabulate vs visit what difference

what is difference between confabulate and visit

English

Etymology

From Latin cōnfābulārī + English -ate (suffix forming verbs with the sense of acting in the specified manner). Cōnfābulārī is the present active infinitive of cōnfābulor (to converse; to discuss), from con- (prefix indicating a bringing together) + fābulor (to chat, converse, talk; to make up a story) (from fābula (discourse, narrative; fable, story) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to say, speak)) + for (to say, speak, talk)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /kənˈfæbjʊleɪt/
  • Hyphenation: con‧fab‧ul‧ate

Verb

confabulate (third-person singular simple present confabulates, present participle confabulating, simple past and past participle confabulated)

  1. (intransitive) To speak casually with; to chat.
    Synonym: confab
  2. (intransitive) To confer.
  3. (transitive, intransitive, psychology) To fabricate memories in order to fill gaps in one’s memory.
    • 1991, George P. Prigatano Chairman, Daniel L. Schacter, Awareness of Deficit after Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues …
      “It has been well established that the speech areas in the absence of input often confabulate a response.”

Derived terms

  • confab (verb)

Related terms

Translations

References


Italian

Verb

confabulate

  1. inflection of confabulare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of confabulato

Latin

Participle

cōnfābulāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of cōnfābulātus


English

Etymology

From Middle English visiten, from Old French visiter, from Latin vīsitō, frequentative of vīsō (behold, survey), from videō (see). Cognate with Old Saxon wīsōn (to visit, afflict), archaic German weisen (to visit, afflict).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɪzɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪzɪt
  • Hyphenation: vis‧it

Verb

visit (third-person singular simple present visits, present participle visiting, simple past and past participle visited)

  1. (transitive) To habitually go to (someone in distress, sickness etc.) to comfort them. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.) [from 13th c.]
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To go and meet (a person) as an act of friendliness or sociability. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive) Of God: to appear to (someone) to comfort, bless, or chastise or punish them. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.) [from 13th c.]
    • [God] hath visited and redeemed his people.
    • Then she arose with her daughters in law, that she might return from the country of Moab: for she had heard in the country of Moab how that the Lord had visited his people in giving them bread.
  4. (transitive, now rare) To punish, to inflict harm upon (someone or something). [from 14th c.]
    • 1788, Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, volume 68:
      Her life was spared by the clemency of the emperor, but he visited the pomp and treasures of her palace.
  5. (transitive) Of a sickness, misfortune etc.: to afflict (someone). [from 14th c.]
    • 1890, James George Frazer, The Golden Bough:
      There used to be a sharp contest as to where the effigy was to be made, for the people thought that the house from which it was carried forth would not be visited with death that year.
  6. (transitive) To inflict punishment, vengeance for (an offense) on or upon someone. [from 14th c.]
    • 2011, John Mullan, The Guardian, 2 Dec 2011:
      If this were an Ibsen play, we would be thinking of the sins of one generation being visited upon another, he said.
  7. (transitive) To go to (a shrine, temple etc.) for worship. (Now generally merged into later senses, below.) [from 14th c.]
  8. (transitive) To go to (a place) for pleasure, on an errand, etc. [from 15th c.]
    • 2018, VOA Learning English > China’s Melting Glacier Brings Visitors, Adds to Climate Concerns
      Each year, millions of people visit the 4,570-meter-high Baishui Glacier in southern China.
Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (go and meet):: call on

Translations

Noun

visit (plural visits)

  1. A single act of visiting.
  2. (medicine, insurance) A meeting with a doctor at their surgery or the doctor’s at one’s home.

Derived terms

Translations

Related terms

  • unvisited
  • visitation
  • visitor

Latin

Verb

vīsit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of vīsō
  2. third-person singular perfect active indicative of vīsō

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