confess vs squeal what difference

what is difference between confess and squeal

English

Etymology

From Middle English confessen, from Anglo-Norman confesser, from Old French confesser, from Medieval Latin confessō (I confess), a derivative of Latin confessus (Old French confés), past participle of cōnfiteor (I confess, I admit) from con- + fateor (I admit). Displaced Middle English andetten (to confess, admit) (from Old English andettan).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈfɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Verb

confess (third-person singular simple present confesses, present participle confessing, simple past and past participle confessed)

  1. To admit to the truth, particularly in the context of sins or crimes committed.
    I confess to spray-painting all over that mural!
    I confess that I am a sinner.
    • I must confess I was most pleased with a beautiful prospect that none of them have mentioned.
  2. To acknowledge faith in; to profess belief in.
    • Whosoever, therefore, shall confess me before men, him will I confess, also, before my Father which is in heaven.
    • For the Sadducees say that there is no resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit; but the Pharisees confess both.
  3. (religion) To unburden (oneself) of sins to God or a priest, in order to receive absolution.
    • Our beautiful votary took an opportunity of confessing herself to this celebrated father.
  4. (religion) To hear or receive such a confession of sins from.
    • 1523–1525, John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners (translator), Froissart’s Chronicles
      He [] heard mass, and the prince, his son, with him, and the most part of his company were confessed.
  5. To disclose or reveal.

Derived terms

  • fess, fess up

Related terms

  • confession
  • confessional
  • confessor

Translations

See also

  • own up
  • come clean


English

Etymology

18th c. (noun), Middle English (verb); of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /skwiːl/ 
  • (US) IPA(key): /skwil/
  • Rhymes: -iːl

Noun

squeal (plural squeals)

  1. A high-pitched sound, such as the scream of a child, or noisy worn-down brake pads.
  2. The cry of a pig.

Translations

Verb

squeal (third-person singular simple present squeals, present participle squealing, simple past and past participle squealed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To scream with a shrill, prolonged sound.
  2. (intransitive, slang) To give sensitive information about someone to a third party; to rat on someone.

Synonyms

  • (to rat on someone): inform, grass up, snitch; See also Thesaurus:rat out

Derived terms

  • squealer

Translations

Anagrams

  • Quales, equals, queals, quesal

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