confide vs trust what difference

what is difference between confide and trust

English

Etymology

From Latin confīdō (I trust fully, I am assured, confide, rely), from con- (together) + fīdō (I trust); see faith, fidelity.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kənˈfaɪd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪd

Verb

confide (third-person singular simple present confides, present participle confiding, simple past and past participle confided)

  1. (intransitive, now rare) To trust, have faith (in).
    • 1796, Matthew Lewis, The Monk, Folio Society 1985, p. 269:
      “Be calm, lovely Antonia!” he replied; “no danger in near you: confide in my protection.”
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Or, The Modern Prometheus, Everyman’s Library 1973, p. 10:
      “I shall do nothing rashly: you know me sufficiently to confide in my prudence and consideration whenever the safety of others is committed to my care.”
    • 1807, Lord Byron, The Prayer of Nature
      In thy protection I confide.
  2. (transitive, dated) To entrust (something) to the responsibility of someone.
    I confide this mission to you alone.
  3. (intransitive) To take (someone) into one’s confidence, to speak in secret with. ( + in)
    I could no longer keep this secret alone; I decided to confide in my brother.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To say (something) in confidence.
    After several drinks, I confided my problems to the barman.
    She confided that her marriage had been in trouble for some time.

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • confide in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • confide in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Latin

Verb

cōnfīde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cōnfīdō


English

Etymology

From Middle English trust (trust, protection), from Old Norse traust (confidence, help, protection), from Proto-Germanic *traustą, from Proto-Indo-European *drowsdom, from Proto-Indo-European *deru- (be firm, hard, solid).

Akin to Danish trøst, tröst (trust), Saterland Frisian Traast (comfort, solace), West Frisian treast (comfort, solace), Dutch troost (comfort, consolation), German Trost (comfort, consolation), Gothic trausti (trausti, alliance, pact). More at true, tree.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trŭst, IPA(key): /trʌst/, [tɹʌst], [tɹɐst], [t͡ʃɹ-]
  • (Northern England) IPA(key): /trʊst/
  • Rhymes: -ʌst

Noun

trust (countable and uncountable, plural trusts)

  1. Confidence in or reliance on some person or quality.
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes
      O ever-failing trust / In mortal strength!
  2. Dependence upon something in the future; hope.
  3. Confidence in the future payment for goods or services supplied; credit.
  4. That which is committed or entrusted; something received in confidence; a charge.
  5. That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope.
  6. (rare) Trustworthiness, reliability.
  7. The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office.
    • 17th century, John Denham, Of Justice
      Reward them well, if they observe their trust.
  8. (law) The confidence vested in a person who has legal ownership of a property to manage for the benefit of another.
  9. (law) An arrangement whereby property or money is given to be held by a third party (a trustee), on the basis that it will be managed for the benefit of, or eventually transferred to, a stated beneficiary; for example, money to be given to a child when he or she reaches adulthood.
  10. A group of businessmen or traders organised for mutual benefit to produce and distribute specific commodities or services, and managed by a central body of trustees.
  11. (computing) Affirmation of the access rights of a user of a computer system.

Synonyms

  • (confidence in a person or quality): belief, confidence, faith
  • (hope): expectation, hope

Antonyms

  • distrust
  • mistrust
  • untrust
  • wantrust

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

trust (third-person singular simple present trusts, present participle trusting, simple past and past participle trusted)

  1. (transitive) To place confidence in, to rely on, to confide in.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Act I scene iv:
      I will never trust his word after.
    • October 5, 1751, Samuel Johnson, The Rambler No. 162
      He that trusts without reserve will at last be deceived.
  2. (intransitive, with in) To have faith in; to rely on for continuing support or aid.
    ― official US motto
  3. (transitive) To give credence to; to believe; to credit.
  4. (transitive) To hope confidently; to believe (usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object)
    • I trust to come unto you, and speak face to face.
    • We trust we have a good conscience.
  5. (transitive) to show confidence in a person by entrusting them with something.
  6. (transitive) To commit, as to one’s care; to entrust.
    • .
      Merchants were not willing to trust precious cargoes to any custody but that of a man-of-war.
  7. (transitive) To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment.
  8. (intransitive, followed by to) To rely on (something), as though having trust (on it).
  9. (archaic, transitive) To risk; to venture confidently.
  10. (intransitive) To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide.
    • I will trust and not be afraid.
  11. (archaic, intransitive) To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.

Antonyms

  • distrust
  • mistrust

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

trust (comparative more trust, superlative most trust)

  1. (obsolete) Secure, safe.
  2. (obsolete) Faithful, dependable.
  3. (law) of or relating to a trust.

Anagrams

  • strut, sturt

French

Etymology

From English trust.

Pronunciation

  • (France, Quebec) IPA(key): /tʁœst/

Noun

trust m (plural trusts)

  1. a trust (a group of businessmen or traders)

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English trust.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrast/, /ˈtrɛst/, /ˈtrøst/

Noun

trust m (invariable)

  1. trust (group of people)

Derived terms

  • trust di cervelli (brains trust)

References


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • truste, troste, trist, trest

Etymology

Borrowed from Old Norse traust.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trust/

Noun

trust (uncountable)

  1. confidence, reliance

Descendants

  • English: trust
  • Yola: thrist

References

  • “trust, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English trust.

Noun

trust m (plural trusts)

  1. (finance) trust

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