Conflate vs Confuse what difference

what is difference between Conflate and Confuse

English

Etymology

Attested since 1541: borrowed from Latin cōnflātus, from cōnflō (fuse, melt, or blow together); cōn (with, together) + flō (blow).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kənˈfleɪt/, /kɒnˈfleɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /kənˈfleɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb

conflate (third-person singular simple present conflates, present participle conflating, simple past and past participle conflated)

  1. To bring (things) together and fuse (them) into a single entity.
    Synonyms: fuse, meld
  2. To mix together different elements.
    Synonyms: mix, blend, coalesce, commingle, flux, immix, merge, amalgamate
  3. (by extension) To fail to properly distinguish or keep separate (things); to mistakenly treat (them) as equivalent.
    Synonyms: confuse, mix up, lump together

Related terms

  • conflation

Translations

Adjective

conflate (not comparable)

  1. (biblical criticism) Combining elements from multiple versions of the same text.
    • 1999, Emanuel Tov, The Greek and Hebrew Bible: Collected Essays on the Septuagint:
      Why the redactor created this conflate version, despite its inconsistencies, is a matter of conjecture.

Noun

conflate (plural conflates)

  1. (biblical criticism) A conflate text, one which conflates multiple version of a text together.

References

Anagrams

  • falconet, lactofen

Latin

Verb

cōnflāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of cōnflō


English

Etymology

Back formation from Middle English confused (“frustrated, ruined”), from Anglo-Norman confus, from Latin confusus, past participle of confundō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈfjuːz/
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Verb

confuse (third-person singular simple present confuses, present participle confusing, simple past and past participle confused)

  1. (transitive) to puzzle, perplex, baffle, bewilder (somebody); to afflict by being complicated, contradictory, or otherwise difficult to understand
  2. (transitive) To mix up, muddle up (one thing with another); to mistake (one thing for another).
  3. (transitive) To mix thoroughly; to confound; to disorder.
  4. (transitive, dated) To make uneasy and ashamed; to embarrass.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To rout; discomfit.
  6. (intransitive) To be confused.

Synonyms

  • flummox
  • mistake
  • See also Thesaurus:confuse

Related terms

  • confused
  • confusing
  • confusion

Translations

See also

  • discombobulate

References

  • confuse at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • confuse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.fyz/

Adjective

confuse

  1. feminine singular of confus

Italian

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -uze

Verb

confuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of confuso

Adjective

confuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of confuso

Verb

confuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of confondere

Latin

Participle

cōnfūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of cōnfūsus

References

  • confuse in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • confuse in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • confuse in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • confuse in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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