confuse vs flurry what difference

what is difference between confuse and flurry

English

Etymology

Back formation from Middle English confused (“frustrated, ruined”), from Anglo-Norman confus, from Latin confusus, past participle of confundō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈfjuːz/
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Verb

confuse (third-person singular simple present confuses, present participle confusing, simple past and past participle confused)

  1. (transitive) to puzzle, perplex, baffle, bewilder (somebody); to afflict by being complicated, contradictory, or otherwise difficult to understand
  2. (transitive) To mix up, muddle up (one thing with another); to mistake (one thing for another).
  3. (transitive) To mix thoroughly; to confound; to disorder.
  4. (transitive, dated) To make uneasy and ashamed; to embarrass.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To rout; discomfit.
  6. (intransitive) To be confused.

Synonyms

  • flummox
  • mistake
  • See also Thesaurus:confuse

Related terms

  • confused
  • confusing
  • confusion

Translations

See also

  • discombobulate

References

  • confuse at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • confuse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.fyz/

Adjective

confuse

  1. feminine singular of confus

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /konˈfu.ze/
  • Rhymes: -uze

Verb

confuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of confuso

Adjective

confuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of confuso

Verb

confuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of confondere

Latin

Participle

cōnfūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of cōnfūsus

References

  • confuse in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • confuse in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • confuse in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • confuse in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Etymology

Perhaps an American English blend of flutter and hurry. Alternatively, perhaps from an obsolete term flurr (scatter).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈflʌɹi/ (accents with the “Foot-strut” split)
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈflʊɹi/ (accents without the “Foot-strut” split)
  • Rhymes: -ʌri
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈflʌɹi/ (accents without the “Hurry-furry” merger)
    • Rhymes: -ʌri
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈflɝ.ɹi/ (accents with the “Hurry-furry” merger)

Noun

flurry (plural flurries)

  1. A light, brief snowfall.
  2. A sudden and brief blast or gust; a light, temporary breeze.
    a flurry of wind
  3. A shower of dust, leaves etc. brought on by a sudden gust of wind.
  4. (figuratively) Any sudden activity; a stir.
    • 1998, Gillian Catriona Ramchand, Deconstructing the Lexicon, in Miriam Butt and Wilhelm Geuder, eds. “The Projection of Arguments”
      These [argument structure] modifications are important because they have provoked a flurry of investigation into argument structure operations of merger, demotion etc.
  5. A snack consisting of soft ice cream mixed with small pieces of fruit, cookie crumbs, etc.
    • 1988, K. Wayne Wride, Fruit Treats (in Vegetarian Times number 134, October 1988, page 27)
      Does your “Forbidden Foods” list include banana splits, ice cream sundaes, slurpies, popsicles, frozen yogurts, milk shakes, and ice cream flurries? These foods taste great but have a reputation for being bad for your health.
    • 2002, Tampa Bay Magazine (volume 17, number 3, May-June 2002, page 235)
      They will make your tongue smile with their homemade ice cream, which was voted “Best Taste in the USA Today.” Enjoy exciting toppings to personalize your treat or a yummy sundae, flurry, smoothie, banana split or shake…
  6. The violent spasms of a dying whale.
  7. An occurrence of something (countable instances) in large numbers, happening suddenly or in a short period of time.
    Synonyms: volley, barrage

Translations

Verb

flurry (third-person singular simple present flurries, present participle flurrying, simple past and past participle flurried)

  1. (transitive) To agitate, bewilder, fluster.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 1:
      And so venturing not to say another word, poor Jemima trotted off, exceedingly flurried and nervous.
  2. (intransitive) To move or fall in a flurry.

Translations


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial