confuse vs jumble what difference

what is difference between confuse and jumble

English

Etymology

Back formation from Middle English confused (“frustrated, ruined”), from Anglo-Norman confus, from Latin confusus, past participle of confundō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈfjuːz/
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Verb

confuse (third-person singular simple present confuses, present participle confusing, simple past and past participle confused)

  1. (transitive) to puzzle, perplex, baffle, bewilder (somebody); to afflict by being complicated, contradictory, or otherwise difficult to understand
  2. (transitive) To mix up, muddle up (one thing with another); to mistake (one thing for another).
  3. (transitive) To mix thoroughly; to confound; to disorder.
  4. (transitive, dated) To make uneasy and ashamed; to embarrass.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To rout; discomfit.
  6. (intransitive) To be confused.

Synonyms

  • flummox
  • mistake
  • See also Thesaurus:confuse

Related terms

  • confused
  • confusing
  • confusion

Translations

See also

  • discombobulate

References

  • confuse at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • confuse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.fyz/

Adjective

confuse

  1. feminine singular of confus

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /konˈfu.ze/
  • Rhymes: -uze

Verb

confuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of confuso

Adjective

confuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of confuso

Verb

confuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of confondere

Latin

Participle

cōnfūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of cōnfūsus

References

  • confuse in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • confuse in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • confuse in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • confuse in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /dʒʌmbəl/

  • Rhymes: -ʌmbəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English jumbelen, alteration of jumbren, jombren, a variant of jumpren, frequentative of jumpen (to jump), equal to jump +‎ -le. More at jumber, jump, jumper.

Verb

jumble (third-person singular simple present jumbles, present participle jumbling, simple past and past participle jumbled)

  1. (transitive) To mix or confuse.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Contentment (sermon)
      Why dost thou blend and jumble such inconsistencies together?
    • Every clime and age jumbled together.
  2. (intransitive) To meet or unite in a confused way.
Derived terms
  • jumble up
Translations

Noun

jumble (countable and uncountable, plural jumbles)

  1. A mixture of unrelated things.
  2. (uncountable, Britain) Items for a rummage sale.
  3. (countable, Britain, informal) A rummage sale.
    • 1982, Hunter Davies, Flossie Teacake’s Fur Coat
      “That’s a nice coat,” said Bella. “I used to have one like that. Got it at a jumble. But it didn’t suit me. You look great in it.”
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:hodgepodge
Translations

See also

  • jumble sale

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

jumble (plural jumbles)

  1. (archaic) A small, thin, sugared cake, usually ring-shaped.
Alternative forms
  • jumbal
  • jumball

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