congius vs gallon what difference

what is difference between congius and gallon

English

Alternative forms

  • congy, conge (obsolete)

Etymology

From Latin congius.

Noun

congius (plural congii)

  1. (historical units of measure) An ancient Roman unit of volume in liquid measure consisting of six sextarii or one-eighth amphora (about 118 fluid ounces). (clarification of this definition is needed)
  2. (historical units of measure) An ancient Roman unit of weight under Vespasian equal to the weight of a congius of water. (clarification of this definition is needed)

Related terms

  • congiaria
  • congiary

Anagrams

  • soucing

Latin

Etymology

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κογχίον (konkhíon), diminutive of κόγχη (kónkhē), κόγχος (kónkhos, mussel-shell).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈkon.ɡi.us/, [ˈkɔŋɡiʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈkon.d͡ʒi.us/, [ˈkɔn̠ʲd͡ʒius]

Noun

congius m (genitive congiī or congī); second declension

  1. (historical units of measure) congius, a unit of volume and weight, roughly equal to a gallon. (clarification of this definition is needed)

Declension

Second-declension noun.

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Descendants

  • English: congius
  • French: conge
  • Ancient Greek: κόγγιον (kóngion)
  • Italian: cogno, congio
  • Portuguese: côngio
  • Spanish: congio

References

  • congius in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • congius in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • congius in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • congius in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • congius in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • congius in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Ernout, Alfred; Meillet, Antoine (2001), “congius”, in Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue latine: histoire des mots (in French), with additions and corrections of André J., 4th edition, Paris: Klincksieck, page 137b


English

Etymology

From Middle English gallon, galoun, galun, from Old Northern French galun, galon (liquid measure) (compare Old French jalon), from Late Latin galum, galus (measure of wine), from Vulgar Latin *galla (vessel), possibly from Gaulish [Term?], ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (goblet). Cognate with Ancient Greek κύλιξ (kúlix, cup), Sanskrit कलश (kalaśa, jar, pitcher; measure of liquid). Related to Old French gille (wine measure) (from Medieval Latin gillō (earthenware jar)), Old French jale (bowl), Old French jaloie (measure of capacity).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡælən/
  • Rhymes: -ælən
  • Hyphenation: gal‧lon

Noun

gallon (plural gallons)

  1. A unit of volume, equivalent to eight pints
  2. (Britain, Canada) exactly 4.54609 liters; an imperial gallon
  3. (US) 231 cubic inches or approximately 3.785 liters for liquids (a “U.S. liquid gallon“)
  4. (US) one-eighth of a U.S. bushel or approximately 4.405 liters for dry goods (a “U.S. dry gallon“).
  5. (in the plural, informal) A large quantity (of any liquid).
    The pipe burst and gallons of water flooded into the kitchen.

Translations

Descendants

  • Cebuano: galon
  • Czech: galon
  • Serbo-Croatian: galon
  • Turkish: galon

Further reading

  • gallon on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Loglan

French

Noun

gallon m (plural gallons)

  1. gallon

Norman

Etymology

From Old Northern French galon, from Late Latin galum, galus (measure of wine), from Vulgar Latin *galla (vessel), possibly from Gaulish [Term?], ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (goblet).

Noun

gallon m (plural gallons)

  1. (Jersey) gallon

Tatar

Noun

gallon

  1. gallon (a unit of volume)

References

[1]

Declension


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