congratulate vs pride what difference

what is difference between congratulate and pride

English

Alternative forms

  • gratulate (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin congratulor, congratulatus, from gratus (blessing).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈɡɹæ.t͡ʃʊˌleɪt/, /-t͡ʃə-/
  • (US, sometimes) IPA(key): /kənˈɡɹæ.d͡ʒʊˌleɪt/, /-d͡ʒə-/

Verb

congratulate (third-person singular simple present congratulates, present participle congratulating, simple past and past participle congratulated)

  1. To express one’s sympathetic pleasure or joy to the person(s) it is felt for.
    Remind me to congratulate Dave and Lisa on their wedding.
  2. (reflexive) To consider oneself fortunate in some matter.
    I congratulated myself on the success of my plan.

Derived terms

Translations


Italian

Verb

congratulate

  1. inflection of congratulare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of congratulato

Latin

Participle

congrātulāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of congrātulātus


English

Alternative forms

  • pryde (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English pride, from Old English prȳde, prȳte (pride) (compare Old Norse prýði (bravery, pomp)), derivative of Old English prūd (proud). More at proud. The verb derives from the noun, at least since the 12th century.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹaɪd/, [ˈpɹ̥ʷaɪd]
  • Rhymes: -aɪd
  • Homophone: pried

Noun

pride (countable and uncountable, plural prides)

  1. The quality or state of being proud; an unreasonable overestimation of one’s own superiority in terms of talents, looks, wealth, importance etc., which manifests itself in lofty airs, distance, reserve and often contempt of others.
  2. (having a positive sense, often with of or in) A sense of one’s own worth, and scorn for what is beneath or unworthy of oneself; lofty self-respect; noble self-esteem; elevation of character; dignified bearing; rejection of shame
    • 1790-1793, William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven
      The pride of the peacock is the glory of God.
  3. Proud or disdainful behavior or treatment; insolence or arrogance of demeanor; haughty bearing and conduct; insolent exultation.
    Synonyms: disdain, hubris
    • 1912, G. K. Chesterton, Introduction to Aesop’s Fables
      Pride goeth before the fall.
  4. That of which one is proud; that which excites boasting or self-congratulation; the occasion or ground of self-esteem, or of arrogant and presumptuous confidence, as beauty, ornament, noble character, children, etc.
    • 1770, Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village
      a bold peasantry, their country’s pride
  5. Show; ostentation; glory.
  6. Highest pitch; elevation reached; loftiness; prime; glory,
  7. Consciousness of power; fullness of animal spirits; mettle; wantonness.
  8. Lust; sexual desire; especially, excitement of sexual appetite in a female animal.
  9. (zoology, collective) A company of lions or other large felines.
  10. (zoology) The small European lamprey species Petromyzon branchialis.
  11. Alternative letter-case form of Pride (festival for LGBT people).
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:pride.

Synonyms

  • (a sense of one’s own worth): dignity; See also Thesaurus:pride
  • (proud or disdainful behavior): conceit, disdain; See also Thesaurus:arrogance
  • (lust; sexual desire): See also Thesaurus:lust
  • (lamprey species): prid, sandpiper

Derived terms

Related terms

  • proud

See also

  • clowder, company of small felines

Translations

Verb

pride (third-person singular simple present prides, present participle priding, simple past and past participle prided)

  1. (reflexive) To take or experience pride in something; to be proud of it.
    • 1820, Washington Irving, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
      Ichabod prided himself upon his dancing as much as upon his vocal powers. Not a limb, not a fibre about him was idle; and to have seen his loosely hung frame in full motion and clattering about the room you would have thought Saint Vitus himself, that blessed patron of the dance, was figuring before you in person.

Derived terms

  • prided
  • priding

Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “pride”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • pried, re-dip, redip, riped

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