conjoin vs join what difference

what is difference between conjoin and join

English

Etymology

From Old French conjoindre, from Latin coniungo, from com- together + iungo join, equivalent to con- +‎ join

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈdʒɔɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn

Verb

conjoin (third-person singular simple present conjoins, present participle conjoining, simple past and past participle conjoined)

  1. (transitive) To join together; to unite; to combine.
    They are representatives that will loosely conjoin a nation.
  2. (transitive) To marry.
    I will conjoin you in holy matrimony.
  3. (transitive, grammar) To join as coordinate elements, often with a coordinating conjunction, such as coordinate clauses.
  4. (transitive, mathematics) To combine two sets, conditions, or expressions by a logical AND; to intersect.
  5. (intransitive) To unite, to join, to league.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. XVI, St. Edmund
      And the Body of one Dead; — a temple where the Hero-soul once was and now is not: Oh, all mystery, all pity, all mute awe and wonder; Supernaturalism brought home to the very dullest; Eternity laid open, and the nether Darkness and the upper Light-Kingdoms; — do conjoin there, or exist nowhere!

Synonyms

  • (to join together): affix, attach, join, put together; see also Thesaurus:join
  • (to marry): bewed, wed; see also Thesaurus:marry

Derived terms

Related terms

  • conjunction
  • conjunctiva
  • conjunctive

Translations

Further reading

  • Conjoin @ The Internet Grammar of English


English

Alternative forms

  • joyn, joyne, joyen (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English joinen, joynen, joignen, from Old French joindre, juindre, jungre, from Latin iungō (join, yoke, verb), from Proto-Indo-European *yewg- (to join, unite). Cognate with Old English iucian, iugian, ġeocian, ġyċċan (to join; yoke). More at yoke.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒɔɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn
  • Hyphenation: join

Noun

join (plural joins)

  1. An intersection of piping or wiring; an interconnect.
  2. (computing, databases) An intersection of data in two or more database tables.
  3. (computing) The act of joining something, such as a network.
  4. (algebra) The lowest upper bound, an operation between pairs of elements in a lattice, denoted by the symbol .

Antonyms

  • (lowest upper bound): meet

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

join (third-person singular simple present joins, present participle joining, simple past and past participle joined)

  1. (transitive) To connect or combine into one; to put together.
  2. (intransitive) To come together; to meet.
  3. (transitive) To come into the company of.
  4. (transitive) To become a member of.
  5. (computing, databases, transitive) To produce an intersection of data in two or more database tables.
  6. To unite in marriage.
  7. (obsolete, rare) To enjoin upon; to command.
    • 1527 (originally published, quote is from a later edition), William Tyndale, The Obedience of a Christian Man
      They join them penance, as they call it.
  8. To accept, or engage in, as a contest.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

Synonyms

  • (to combine more than one item into one): bewed, connect, fay, unite; see also Thesaurus:join

Translations

References

  • join on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Nijo

Dalmatian

Alternative forms

  • yoin

Etymology

From Latin ūnus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /join/

Numeral

join (plural joina)

  1. one

Finnish

Etymology 1

Verb

join

  1. first-person singular indicative past of juoda

Etymology 2

Noun

join

  1. instructive plural of joki

Anagrams

  • Joni, ojin

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