connect vs link what difference

what is difference between connect and link

English

Etymology

From Latin connectere (fasten together), from con- (together) +‎ nectere (bind).

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kəˈnɛkt/
  • Hyphenation: con‧nect
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Verb

connect (third-person singular simple present connects, present participle connecting, simple past and past participle connected)

  1. (intransitive, of an object) To join (to another object): to attach, or to be intended to attach or capable of attaching, to another object.
    Synonyms: affix, join, put together, unite; see also Thesaurus:join
  2. (intransitive, of two objects) To join: to attach, or to be intended to attach or capable of attaching, to each other.
  3. (transitive, of an object) To join (two other objects), or to join (one object) to (another object): to be a link between two objects, thereby attaching them to each other.
  4. (transitive, of a person) To join (two other objects), or to join (one object) to (another object): to take one object and attach it to another.
  5. To join an electrical or telephone line to a circuit or network.
  6. To associate; to establish a relation between.
  7. To make a travel connection; to switch from one means of transport to another as part of the same trip.

Antonyms

  • disconnect

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Catalan: conectar
  • Galician: conectar
  • Portuguese: conectar
  • Spanish: conectar

Translations

Anagrams

  • concent


For Wiktionary’s links, see Wiktionary:Links

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɪŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Etymology 1

From Middle English linke, lenke, from a merger of Old English hlenċe, hlenċa (ring; chainkink) and Old Norse *hlenkr, hlekkr (ring; chain); both from Proto-Germanic *hlankiz (ring; bond; fettle; fetter). Used in English since the 14th century. Related to lank.

Noun

link (plural links)

  1. A connection between places, people, events, things, or ideas.
    • 1573, George Gascoigne, A Hundreth Sundry Flowres
  2. One element of a chain or other connected series.
  3. Abbreviation of hyperlink.
  4. (computing) The connection between buses or systems.
  5. (mathematics) A space comprising one or more disjoint knots.
  6. (Sussex) a thin wild bank of land splitting two cultivated patches and often linking two hills.
  7. (figuratively) an individual person or element in a system
    • 2010, James O. Young, My Sheep Know My Voice: anointed poetry, AuthorHouse, page 32:
    • 2010, William Lidwell, Kritina Holden, Jill Butler, Universal Principles of Design, RockPort, page 262:
    • 2010, Stephen Fairweather, The Missing Book of Genesis, AuthorHouse, page 219:
  8. Anything doubled and closed like a link of a chain.
  9. A sausage that is not a patty.
  10. (kinematics) Any one of the several elementary pieces of a mechanism, such as the fixed frame, or a rod, wheel, mass of confined liquid, etc., by which relative motion of other parts is produced and constrained.
  11. (engineering) Any intermediate rod or piece for transmitting force or motion, especially a short connecting rod with a bearing at each end; specifically (in steam engines) the slotted bar, or connecting piece, to the opposite ends of which the eccentric rods are jointed, and by means of which the movement of the valve is varied, in a link motion.
  12. (surveying) The length of one joint of Gunter’s chain, being the hundredth part of it, or 7.92 inches, the chain being 66 feet in length.
  13. (chemistry) A bond of affinity, or a unit of valence between atoms; applied to a unit of chemical force or attraction.
  14. (in the plural) The windings of a river; the land along a winding stream.
    • 1822, Allan Cunningham, “The King of the Peak”, in Traditional Tales of the English and Scottish Peasantry, v. 1, p. 222.
      ‘Dame Foljambe,’ said the old man, ‘the march of thy tale is like the course of the Wye, seventeen miles of links and windings down a fair valley five miles long. []
  15. (broadcasting) An introductory cue.
    • 2002, Carole Fleming, The Radio Handbook (page 53)
      Too much talk on a music-based station can cause listeners who tune in for the music to go elsewhere. [] ‘Some people will say “your link has to be 45 seconds long” but I don’t do that,’ explains the programme controller of Trent FM, Dick Stone.
Synonyms
  • (connection between things): connection; See also Thesaurus:link
Holonyms
  • (element of a connected series): chain
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • link farm
Translations

Verb

link (third-person singular simple present links, present participle linking, simple past and past participle linked)

  1. (transitive) To connect two or more things.
    • 1813, John Chetwode Eustace, A Tour Through Italy
      All the tribes and nations that composed it [the Roman Empire] were linked together, not only by the same laws and the same government, but by all the facilities of commodious intercourse, and of frequent communication.
  2. (intransitive, of a Web page) To contain a hyperlink to another page.
  3. (transitive, Internet) To supply (somebody) with a hyperlink; to direct by means of a link.
  4. (transitive, Internet) To post a hyperlink to.
  5. (transitive) To demonstrate a correlation between two things.
  6. (software compilation) To combine objects generated by a compiler into a single executable.
Synonyms
  • (to connect two or more things): affix, attach, join, put together; see also Thesaurus:join
Derived terms
  • link in
  • link out
  • link up
Translations

Etymology 2

Plausibly a modification of Medieval Latin linchinus (candle), an alteration of Latin lynchinus, itself from Ancient Greek λύχνος (lúkhnos, lamp).

Noun

link (plural links)

  1. (obsolete) A torch, used to light dark streets.
    • You were coming out of the Italian Opera, ma’am, in white satin and jewels, a blaze of splendour, when I hadn’t a penny to buy a link to light you.’
Derived terms
  • linkboy
  • linkman
Translations

Etymology 3

Origin unknown.

Verb

link (third-person singular simple present links, present participle linking, simple past and past participle linked)

  1. (Scotland, intransitive) To skip or trip along smartly; to go quickly.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      On a sudden he was aware of a man linking along at his side. He cried a fine night, and the man replied.
Translations

See also

  • Malvern Link

References

  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams

  • kiln

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɪŋk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Noun

link m

  1. link, hyperlink

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English link (since 1995).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lenk/, [leŋɡ̊]

Noun

link n (singular definite linket, plural indefinite link or links)

  1. link (hyperlink)

Inflection

Synonyms

  • hyperlink

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɪŋk/
  • Hyphenation: link
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

link (comparative linker, superlative linkst)

  1. dangerous
  2. (criminal slang) sly; cunning
  3. (slang) jolly, nice
Inflection
Derived terms
  • linkerd
  • linkmiegel

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English link, only since late 20th century.

Noun

link m (plural links, diminutive linkje n)

  1. physical connection, as in a hardware cable
  2. (figuratively) logical connection, as in reasoning about causality
  3. hyperlink
Synonyms
  • (physical connection): verbinding
  • (logical connection): verband
  • (hyperlink): koppeling, verwijzing
Derived terms
  • linken

References

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

German

Etymology

From Middle High German linc, from Old High German *link; compare Old High German linka (the left hand).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɪŋk/

Adjective

link (comparative linker, superlative am linksten)

  1. left
  2. sly; cunning
  3. dangerous

Declension

Further reading

  • “link” in Duden online

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈliŋk]
  • Rhymes: -iŋk

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English link.

Noun

link (plural linkek)

  1. link, hyperlink
    Synonyms: hivatkozás, hiperhivatkozás
Declension

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Yiddish לינק(link), from German link (left).

Adjective

link (comparative linkebb, superlative leglinkebb)

  1. (colloquial) flighty, fickle, fishy, shifty, sleazy, phoney (unreliable, irresponsible, often dishonest)
    Synonyms: könnyelmű, léha, komolytalan, megbízhatatlan, szélhámos
Declension

Derived terms

References

Further reading

  • (flighty, fickle, sleazy): link in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English link.

Noun

link m (invariable)

  1. (computing) link (hyperlink)
    Synonym: collegamento

Derived terms

  • linkare

Lithuanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [liŋk]

Preposition

lĩnk

  1. toward (used with genitive case)

Pennsylvania German

Etymology

Compare German link.

Adjective

link

  1. left, left-hand

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from English link.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lʲink/

Noun

link m inan

  1. link, hyperlink

Declension

Synonyms

  • hiperłącze

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English link.

Noun

link m (plural links)

  1. (computing) link (text or a graphic that can be activated to open another document)
    Synonyms: linque, hiperligação, ligação

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English link.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlink/, [ˈlĩŋk]

Noun

link m (plural links)

  1. (computing) link (text or a graphic that can be activated to open another document)
    Synonym: enlace

Derived terms

  • linquear

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